Rates of perfect self-reported adherence to direct-acting antiviral therapy and its correlates among people who inject drugs on medications for opioid use disorder: The PREVAIL study

Irene Pericot-Valverde, Lior Rennert, Moonseong Heo, Matthew J. Akiyama, Briana L. Norton, Linda Agyemang, Brandon Lumsden, Alain H. Litwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adequate adherence to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is critical to attaining sustained virologic response (SVR). In this PREVAIL study's secondary analyses, we explored the association between self-reported and objective DAAs adherence among a sample of people who inject drugs (PWID) receiving medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) (N = 147). Self-reported adherence was recoded 3 times during treatment (weeks 4, 8 and 12) using a visual analog scale (VAS), whereas objective adherence was collected continuously during treatment using electronic blister packs. Participants who reported being perfectly adherent had significantly higher blister pack adherence in each period (weeks 4, 8 and 12; ps <.05) and over the 12-week study (p <.001) compared to those who reported being non-perfectly adherent. Whites were more likely to report perfect adherence (91.7%) than Blacks (48.7%), Latinos (52.2%) and other (75.0%) race groups. Participants who reported recent use of cocaine (63.9%) or polysubstance use (60.0%) and those who had a positive result for cocaine (62.8%) were more likely to be non-perfectly adherent, although none of these factors were associated with blister pack adherence. This study showed that the VAS could serve as a reliable option for assessing DAAs adherence among PWID on MOUD. The implementation of VAS may be an ideal option for monitoring adherence among PWID on MOUD, especially in clinical settings with limited resources. PWID on MOUD who are Black or other races than White, as well as those who report recent cocaine or polysubstance use may require additional support to maintain optimal DAA adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-557
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Viral Hepatitis
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • direct-acting antiviral
  • hepatitis C virus
  • medications for opioid use disorder
  • people who inject drugs
  • self-reported Adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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