Randomised controlled study of conjunctival autograft versus amniotic membrane graft in pterygium excision

P. Luanratanakorn, T. Ratanapakorn, O. Suwan-Apichon, Roy S. Chuck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To determine whether amniotic membrane can be used as an alternative to conjunctival autograft after pterygium excision. Methods: 287 eyes with either primary or recurrent pterygium were included in this study. All eyes were randomised to undergo conjunctival autograft or amniotic membrane transplantation after pterygium excision by a single surgeon. 106 eyes in primary pterygium and 14 eyes in the recurrent group were treated with conjunctival autograft, and 148 eyes in primary pterygium and 19 eyes in the recurrent group were treated with amniotic membrane transplantation. Patients were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months after operation. The main outcome measurement was recurrence rate after surgery. Results: In the conjunctival group, the recurrence rate was 12.3%, 21.4% and 13.1% for primary, recurrent and all pterygia, respectively. In the amniotic membrane group, the recurrence rate was 25.0%, 52.6% and 28.1% for primary, recurrent and all pterygia, respectively. The recurrence rate for all pterygia in the amniotic membrane group was significantly higher than that in the conjunctival group (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Amniotic membrane graft had a higher recurrence rate than conjunctival autograft. However, it is an alternative choice, especially for advanced cases with bilateral heads or patients who might need glaucoma surgery later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1476-1480
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume90
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Pterygium
Amnion
Autografts
Transplants
Recurrence
Transplantation
Glaucoma
Head

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Randomised controlled study of conjunctival autograft versus amniotic membrane graft in pterygium excision. / Luanratanakorn, P.; Ratanapakorn, T.; Suwan-Apichon, O.; Chuck, Roy S.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 90, No. 12, 12.2006, p. 1476-1480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luanratanakorn, P. ; Ratanapakorn, T. ; Suwan-Apichon, O. ; Chuck, Roy S. / Randomised controlled study of conjunctival autograft versus amniotic membrane graft in pterygium excision. In: British Journal of Ophthalmology. 2006 ; Vol. 90, No. 12. pp. 1476-1480.
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