Radiation Exposure of Premature Infants Beyond the Perinatal Period

Alexander H. Hogan, Eran Y. Bellin, Lindsey Douglas, Terry L. Levin, Nora Esteban-Cruciani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

RESULTS: In our study, 20 049 term and 2047 preterm infants met inclusion criteria. The population was approximately one-half female, predominantly multiracial or people of color (40% African American and 44% multiracial), and of low socioeconomic status. Premature infants had 2.25 times greater odds of crossing the threshold compared with term infants after adjustment for demographics (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.66-3.05). Adjustment for complex chronic conditions, which are validated metrics of pediatric chronic illness, attenuated this association; however, premature infants still had 1.58 times greater odds of crossing the threshold (95% CI: 1.16-2.15). When the final model was analyzed by degree of prematurity, very preterm and extremely preterm infants were significantly more likely to cross the threshold (1.85 [95% CI: 1.03-3.32] and 2.53 [95% CI: 1.53-4.21], respectively), whereas late preterm infants were not (1.14 [95% CI: 0.73-1.78]).

METHODS: In this observational retrospective cohort study, we compared the radiation exposure of premature and term infants between 2008 and 2015 in an urban hospital system. The primary outcome was crossing the radiation exposure threshold of 1 millisievert. We assessed prematurity's effect on this outcome with multivariable logistic regression.

CONCLUSIONS: Premature infants crossed the recommended radiation threshold more often than term infants in the year after discharge from birth hospitalization.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the odds of premature compared with term infants exceeding the recommended radiation exposure threshold in the first year after discharge from birth hospitalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-678
Number of pages7
JournalHospital pediatrics
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Premature Infants
Confidence Intervals
Hospitalization
Extremely Premature Infants
Parturition
Urban Hospitals
Social Class
African Americans
Radiation Exposure
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Color
Logistic Models
Demography
Radiation
Pediatrics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Radiation Exposure of Premature Infants Beyond the Perinatal Period. / Hogan, Alexander H.; Bellin, Eran Y.; Douglas, Lindsey; Levin, Terry L.; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora.

In: Hospital pediatrics, Vol. 8, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 672-678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hogan, AH, Bellin, EY, Douglas, L, Levin, TL & Esteban-Cruciani, N 2018, 'Radiation Exposure of Premature Infants Beyond the Perinatal Period', Hospital pediatrics, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. 672-678. https://doi.org/10.1542/hpeds.2018-0008
Hogan, Alexander H. ; Bellin, Eran Y. ; Douglas, Lindsey ; Levin, Terry L. ; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora. / Radiation Exposure of Premature Infants Beyond the Perinatal Period. In: Hospital pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 11. pp. 672-678.
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