Racial/ethnic differences in spontaneous HCV clearance in HIV infected and uninfected women

Monika Sarkar, Peter Bacchetti, Phyllis Tien, Elizabeth Mileti, Audrey L. French, Brian R. Edlin, Marla Keller, Eric Seaberg, Marek J. Nowicki, Mary Young, Marion G. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aims: Among individuals without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), African Americans have lower spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) than Caucasians, and women have higher clearance than men. Few studies report racial/ethnic differences in acute HCV in HIV infected, or Hispanic women. We examined racial/ethnic differences in spontaneous HCV clearance in a population of HCV mono- and co-infected women. Methods: We conducted a cross sectional study of HCV seropositive women (897 HIV infected and 168 HIV uninfected) followed in the US multicenter, NIH-funded Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), to determine the association of race/ethnicity with spontaneous HCV clearance, as defined by undetectable HCV RNA at study entry. Results: Among HIV and HCV seropositive women, 18.7 % were HCV RNA negative, 60.9 % were African American, 19.3 % Hispanic and 17.7 % Caucasian. HIV infected African American women were less likely to spontaneously clear HCV than Hispanic (OR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.38-0.93, p = 0.022) or Caucasian women (OR 0.57, 95 % CI 0.36-0.93, p = 0.023). Among HIV uninfected women, African Americans had less HCV clearance than Hispanics (OR 0.18, 95 % CI 0.07-0.48, p = 0.001) or Caucasians (OR 0.26, 95 % CI 0.09-0.79, p = 0.017). There were no significant differences in HCV clearance between Hispanics and Caucasians, among either HIV infected (OR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.57-1.66, p = 0.91) or uninfected (OR 1.45, 95 % CI 0.56-3.8, p = 0.45) women. Conclusions: African Americans were less likely to spontaneously clear HCV than Hispanics or Caucasians, regardless of HIV status. No significant differences in spontaneous HCV clearance were observed between Caucasian and Hispanic women. Future studies incorporating IL28B genotype may further explain these observed racial/ethnic differences in spontaneous HCV clearance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1341-1348
Number of pages8
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Keywords

  • Acute hepatitis C
  • African American
  • Female
  • Hispanic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

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