Racial differences in response rates to consensus interferon in HCV infected patients naive to previous therapy

Paul J. Gaglio, Maribel Rodriguez-Torres, Robert Herring, Bhupinder Anand, Terry Box, Mordechai Rabinovitz, Robert S. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Despite a rapid evolution in the treatment of Hepatitis C (HCV), response to therapy among different racial and ethnic groups is poorly characterized. Study: Three hundred and thirty HCV infected patients naive to previous therapy received induction therapy followed by every other day dosing with consensus interferon. Greater than 30% of treated patients were not white, allowing comparison of response among different races/ethnicities and genotypes. Results: An overall sustained virologic response (SVR) was achieved in 24% of white, 12% of Hispanic, and 4% of AA patients (P = 0.003 white vs. non-white). 15% of white and 13% of Hispanic Genotype 1 patients achieved an SVR; 2% of AA patients achieved an SVR (P = 0.001 AA vs. non AA). Surprisingly, an SVR of 50% and 40% was achieved by AA and White Genotype 2 patients, compared with 10% in Hispanic patients (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Significant differences in response rates to induction therapy followed by every other day dosing with consensus Interferon was observed when comparing white to non-white patients, particularly when comparing response rates by genotype. These observations reinforce the requirement that prospective studies that enroll a significant percentage of non-whites are needed to adequately characterize response rates to anti-HCV directed therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-604
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of clinical gastroenterology
Volume38
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

Keywords

  • African American
  • Consensus interferon
  • Hepatitis C
  • Hispanic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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