Quo vadis, my transplant fellow: A discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training activity in the United States and Canada: 1991-1997

D. B. Kaufman, N. L. Ascher, Jr Auchincloss H., A. I. Benvenisty, N. J. Feduska, D. W. Hanto, J. M. Henderson, L. Makowka, J. S. Melzer, C. M. Miller, S. R. Munn, R. Nowygrod, V. A. Tellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training issues that pertain to educational quality guidelines of fellowship programs, the number of fellows being trained, and the individual's fate in securing transplant surgery positions after training. In 1995, the Council of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) revised the academic guidelines to enhance the educational standards of programs seeking ASTS approval as a transplant surgery fellowship training program. The criteria for accrediting training programs in kidney and liver transplant surgery were redefined, and new criteria for pancreas transplant surgery training were developed. Regarding the number of transplant surgery fellows being trained per year, during the period from 1991 to 1997, a total of 327 transplant surgery fellows completed training at ASTS-accredited transplant surgery fellowship training programs. The annual number of transplant surgery fellowship graduates has remained nearly constant at approximately 45 per year. However, the proportion of transplant surgery trainees who are foreign medical graduates has increased annually since 1995. Currently, 49% of the trainees are foreign medical graduates. Regarding the individual's fates in securing transplant surgery positions after training, the proportion of U.S./Canadian medical graduates who received transplant surgery training during the last year but are practicing in surgical disciplines other than transplant surgery appears to be increasing. Before 1996, it was rare for transplant surgery trainees to pursue surgical practice activities that did not include transplantation. Among the current group of 28 U.S/Canadian medical graduates who completed transplant surgery training between January 1997 and July 1997, six did not secure an acceptable position in transplantation. Instead, they are practicing in either general surgery or vascular surgery, or obtaining additional transplant training. These changes in the demographics and dynamics of transplant surgery fellowship training activity provoke important concerns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-272
Number of pages4
JournalTransplantation
Volume65
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 27 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Canada
Teaching
Transplants
Foreign Medical Graduates
Education
Transplantation
Guidelines
Blood Vessels
Pancreas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Kaufman, D. B., Ascher, N. L., Auchincloss H., J., Benvenisty, A. I., Feduska, N. J., Hanto, D. W., ... Tellis, V. A. (1998). Quo vadis, my transplant fellow: A discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training activity in the United States and Canada: 1991-1997. Transplantation, 65(2), 269-272.

Quo vadis, my transplant fellow : A discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training activity in the United States and Canada: 1991-1997. / Kaufman, D. B.; Ascher, N. L.; Auchincloss H., Jr; Benvenisty, A. I.; Feduska, N. J.; Hanto, D. W.; Henderson, J. M.; Makowka, L.; Melzer, J. S.; Miller, C. M.; Munn, S. R.; Nowygrod, R.; Tellis, V. A.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 65, No. 2, 27.01.1998, p. 269-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaufman, DB, Ascher, NL, Auchincloss H., J, Benvenisty, AI, Feduska, NJ, Hanto, DW, Henderson, JM, Makowka, L, Melzer, JS, Miller, CM, Munn, SR, Nowygrod, R & Tellis, VA 1998, 'Quo vadis, my transplant fellow: A discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training activity in the United States and Canada: 1991-1997', Transplantation, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 269-272.
Kaufman DB, Ascher NL, Auchincloss H. J, Benvenisty AI, Feduska NJ, Hanto DW et al. Quo vadis, my transplant fellow: A discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training activity in the United States and Canada: 1991-1997. Transplantation. 1998 Jan 27;65(2):269-272.
Kaufman, D. B. ; Ascher, N. L. ; Auchincloss H., Jr ; Benvenisty, A. I. ; Feduska, N. J. ; Hanto, D. W. ; Henderson, J. M. ; Makowka, L. ; Melzer, J. S. ; Miller, C. M. ; Munn, S. R. ; Nowygrod, R. ; Tellis, V. A. / Quo vadis, my transplant fellow : A discussion of transplant surgery fellowship training activity in the United States and Canada: 1991-1997. In: Transplantation. 1998 ; Vol. 65, No. 2. pp. 269-272.
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