Quantitative determination of immunoglobulin G specific for group B streptococcal β C protein in human maternal serum

Catherine S. Lachenauer, Carol J. Baker, Miriam J. Baron, Dennis L. Kasper, Claudia Gravekamp, Lawrence C. Madoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The β C protein of group B streptococci (GBS) elicits antibody that is protective against GBS challenge in animals and is considered to be a potential component of a GBS conjugate vaccine. We developed a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure β-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and used it to compare β-specific IgG in a group of mothers of neonates with invasive type Ib/β GBS disease and a group of mothers colonized with Ib/β strains whose neonates remained well. β-Specific IgG concentrations from these 2 groups were similar. To investigate differences in β-specific antibody in animals and humans, protein fragments were generated that corresponded to major regions within the β C protein. A single major region was predominantly recognized in human and rabbit serum samples. Thus, in contrast to immunized animals, no relationship was seen between levels of naturally acquired human β-specific IgG and protection from neonatal disease. This difference was not explained by a major difference in epitope specificity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-374
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume185
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Protein C
Streptococcus agalactiae
Immunoglobulin G
Mothers
Serum
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Conjugate Vaccines
Antibodies
Epitopes
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Rabbits
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Quantitative determination of immunoglobulin G specific for group B streptococcal β C protein in human maternal serum. / Lachenauer, Catherine S.; Baker, Carol J.; Baron, Miriam J.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Gravekamp, Claudia; Madoff, Lawrence C.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 185, No. 3, 01.02.2002, p. 368-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lachenauer, Catherine S. ; Baker, Carol J. ; Baron, Miriam J. ; Kasper, Dennis L. ; Gravekamp, Claudia ; Madoff, Lawrence C. / Quantitative determination of immunoglobulin G specific for group B streptococcal β C protein in human maternal serum. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2002 ; Vol. 185, No. 3. pp. 368-374.
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