Quantitative Changes in Tumor Metabolism, Partial Pressure of Oxygen, and Radiobiological Oxygenation Status Postradiation

Jason A. Koutcher, Alan A. Alfieri, Mary L. Devitt, Umar Mahmood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hypoxia is considered to be a major cause of tumor radioresistance. Reoxygenation of previously hypoxic areas after a priming dose of radiation is associated with an increase in tumor radiosensitivity. In a study of a hypoxic mammary carcinoma, 31P nuclear magnetic reso-nance spectra showed statistically significant increases in metabolite ratios (phosphocreatine/P1 and nucleotide triphosphate/P1) after 65 and 32 Gy. The maximum changes in metabolite ratios after 32 Gy occurred at 48 h, although significant changes were detected at 24 h. A corresponding increase in the mean tumor pO2 (polarographic microelectrode measurements) and a decrease in hypoxic cell fraction [changes in paired (clamped versus undamped) tumor control dose for 50% of tumors) were also shown to occur 48 h after a priming dose of 32 Gy. A significant increase in the mean tumor pO2, phosphocreatine/P1, and nucleotide triphosphate/P1, compared to initial values, was noted at 24, 48, and 96 h post 65-Gy radiation. An increase in the downfield component of the phosphomonoester peak relative to the upfield component (phosphoethanolamine), is also noted after doses of 65 and 32 Gy. These are likely to be due to cell kill and/or decreased cell proliferation. In this tumor model, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic changes postradiation are temporally coincident with and may be indicative of tumor reoxygenation as measured by the tumor control dose for 50% of tumors and oxygen-sensitive microelectrodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4620-4627
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume52
Issue number17
StatePublished - Sep 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Koutcher, J. A., Alfieri, A. A., Devitt, M. L., & Mahmood, U. (1992). Quantitative Changes in Tumor Metabolism, Partial Pressure of Oxygen, and Radiobiological Oxygenation Status Postradiation. Cancer Research, 52(17), 4620-4627.