Quality Assurance Initiative at One Institution for Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy as the Initial Diagnostic Technique

Emily M. Clarke-Pearson, Allyson F. Jacobson, Susan K. Boolbol, I. Michael Leitman, Patricia Friedmann, Valentina Lavarias, Sheldon M. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In 2005, the American College of Surgeons Consensus Conference issued a statement about the diagnostic workup of image-detected breast abnormalities. Guidelines include use of image-guided percutaneous needle biopsy as the gold standard for diagnosing image-detected breast abnormalities. In this study, we evaluate a method to audit use of excisional biopsy among different breast surgeons at our institution. Study Design: From March to September 2007, 465 patients undergoing breast operation for benign or malignant lesions at our institution were interviewed by a surgical resident or physician's assistant. If an excisional biopsy was scheduled for initial diagnosis, the patient and surgeon were asked whose preference it was to perform the operation. Three attending groups were designated: academic breast surgeons, private practice breast surgeons on clinical faculty, and general surgeons who perform breast operations in addition to other procedures. Use of excisional biopsy was compared between these groups. Results: Compliance for preoperative interview completion was 79%, differing substantially between surgeon groups with rates of 91%, 74%, and 58% for the academic breast, private practice, and general surgeons, respectively. Excisional biopsy for diagnosis made up 10%, 35%, and 37% of the case load for academic breast, private practice, and general surgeons, respectively. Patient and surgeon agreed 85% of the time for preference of performing diagnostic excisional biopsies. Conclusions: Excisional biopsies continue to be performed as the initial diagnostic procedure for 40% of patients. Tracking biopsy practices by surgeon can improve adherence with current recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-78
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume208
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Breast
Biopsy
Private Practice
Surgeons
Physician Assistants
Needle Biopsy
Compliance
Guidelines
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Quality Assurance Initiative at One Institution for Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy as the Initial Diagnostic Technique. / Clarke-Pearson, Emily M.; Jacobson, Allyson F.; Boolbol, Susan K.; Leitman, I. Michael; Friedmann, Patricia; Lavarias, Valentina; Feldman, Sheldon M.

In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 208, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 75-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clarke-Pearson, Emily M. ; Jacobson, Allyson F. ; Boolbol, Susan K. ; Leitman, I. Michael ; Friedmann, Patricia ; Lavarias, Valentina ; Feldman, Sheldon M. / Quality Assurance Initiative at One Institution for Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy as the Initial Diagnostic Technique. In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2009 ; Vol. 208, No. 1. pp. 75-78.
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