Putative protective effects of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors on atrial fibrillation through risk factor modulation and off-target actions: potential mechanisms and future directions

Syona S. Shetty, Andrew Krumerman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia, results in substantial morbidity and mortality related to its increased risks of stroke, heart failure, and impaired cognitive function. The incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation in the general population is rising, making atrial fibrillation treatment and management of its risk factors highly relevant clinical targets. One well-studied risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation is diabetes mellitus. Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), common medications used to treat diabetes mellitus, have been observed to decrease the incidence of atrial fibrillation. This review discusses the SGLT2 and its role in glucose homeostasis, molecules inhibiting the transporter, possible physiological mechanisms responsible for the decreased incident atrial fibrillation in patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors and proposes mechanistic studies to further our understanding of the biological processes involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number119
JournalCardiovascular Diabetology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Epicardial adipose tissue
  • Left ventricular function
  • Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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