Psychopathology and psychotherapy in the dying AIDS patient

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIDS is not yet the problem in Japan that it is in North America, Europe and Africa, but at the recent 10th International AIDS Conference held in Japan, it was estimated that more Asians will become infected with HIV in the coming year than any other population worldwide. Although the majority of these infections will occur in Thailand and India, it was estimated that there may be as many as 15000 HIV positive individuals in Japan, a number expected to rise to 26000 over the next 3 years. Although AIDS is arriving in Japan later, this may give society in general and the medical profession in particular, time to learn from the experiences and mistakes of those who had a head start in dealing with the epidemic. Although this paper deals with the dying AIDS patient, some of the issues faced by the therapist working with any population of dying patients will be reviewed before focusing more specifically, on some of the particular issues seen in working with AIDS patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume49
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Psychopathology
Psychotherapy
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Japan
HIV
Northern Africa
Thailand
North America
Population
India
Infection

Keywords

  • affective disorders
  • AIDS
  • death and dying
  • factitious disorder
  • HIV-1
  • hypochondriasis
  • psychiatric syndromes
  • psychosocial problems
  • psychotherapy
  • suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology

Cite this

Psychopathology and psychotherapy in the dying AIDS patient. / O'Dowd, Mary A.

In: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Vol. 49, No. SUPPL. 1, 1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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