Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 as a therapeutic target for kras mutated colorectal cancer

David Shifteh, Tzuriel Sapir, Moshe Pahmer, Adam Haimowitz, Sanjay Goel, Radhashree Maitra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nearly 45% of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients harbor a mutation in their KRAS gene for which, despite many years of research, there are still no targeted therapies available. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is a transcription regulator for multiple cellular processes that is currently being tested as a potential target in several cancer types. PRMT5 has been previously shown to be overexpressed in approximately 75% of CRC patient tumor samples, as well as negatively correlated with CRC patient survival. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 can act as a surrogate target for mutated KRAS in CRC. Our findings show that PRMT5 expression is upregulated, as well as positively correlated with KRAS expression, in CRC patient datasets. Moreover, our results reveal that PRMT5 is further overexpressed in KRAS mutant CRC cells when compared to KRAS wild type (WT) CRC cells at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Additionally, our data demonstrate that this further overexpression of PRMT5 in the KRAS mutant CRC cells affects an even greater degree of growth inhibition, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest, following treatment with PRMT5 inhibitor, when compared to the KRAS WT CRC cells. Our research therefore suggests for the first time that PRMT5 and KRAS may crosstalk, and thus, PRMT5 can potentially be used as a surrogate target for mutated KRAS in CRC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2091
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalCancers
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Arginine methylation
  • CRC
  • EPZ015666
  • KRAS
  • PRMT5

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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