Prospective assessment of the feasibility of a trial of low–tidal volume ventilation for patients with acute respiratory failure

Michael J. Lanspa, Michelle Ng Gong, David A. Schoenfeld, Kathleen Tiffany Lee, Colin K. Grissom, Peter C. Hou, Ary Serpa-Neto, Samuel M. Brown, Theodore J. Iwashyna, Donald M. Yealy, Catherine L. Hough, Roy G. Brower, Carolyn S. Calfee, Robert C. Hyzy, Michael A. Matthay, Russell R. Miller, Jay S. Steingrub, B. Taylor Thompson, Chadwick D. Miller, Terry P. ClemmerGregory W. Hendey, David T. Huang, Kusum S. Mathews, Nida Qadir, Mark Tidswell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Low–tidal volume ventilation (LTVV; 6 ml/kg) benefits patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and may aid those with other causes of respiratory failure. Current early ventilation practices are poorly defined. Objectives: We observed patients with acute respiratory failure to assess the feasibility of a pragmatic trial of LTVV and to guide experimental design. Methods: We prospectively enrolled consecutive patients with acute respiratory failure admitted to intensive care units expected to participate in the proposed trial. We collected clinical data as well as information on initial and daily ventilator settings and inpatient mortality. We estimated the benefit of LTVV using predictive linear and nonlinear models. We simulated models to estimate power and feasibility of a cluster-randomized trial of LTVV versus usual care in acute respiratory failure. Results: We included 2,484 newly mechanically ventilated patients (31% with acute respiratory distress syndrome) from 49 hospitals. Hospital mortality was 28%. Mean initial tidal volume was 7.1 ml/kg predicted body weight (95% confidence interval, 7.1–7.2), with 78% of patients receiving tidal volumes less than or equal to 8 ml/kg. Our models estimated a mortality benefit of 0–2% from LTVV compared with usual care. Simulation of a stepped-wedged cluster-randomized trial suggested that enrollment of 106,361 patients would be necessary to achieve greater than 90% power. Conclusions: Use of initial tidal volumes less than 8 ml/kg predicted body weight was common at hospitals participating in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Prevention and Early Treatment of Acute Lung Injury (PETAL) Network. After considering the size and budgetary requirement for a cluster-randomized trial of LTVV versus usual care in acute respiratory failure, the PETAL Network deemed the proposed trial infeasible. A rapid observational study and simulations to model anticipated power may help better design trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)356-362
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the American Thoracic Society
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Respiratory Insufficiency
Ventilation
Tidal Volume
Acute Lung Injury
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Pragmatic Clinical Trials
Body Weight
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Nonlinear Dynamics
Mortality
Mechanical Ventilators
Hospital Mortality
Observational Studies
Intensive Care Units
Inpatients
Linear Models
Research Design
Confidence Intervals
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Low-stretch ventilation
  • Low–tidal volume ventilation
  • Lung-protective ventilation
  • Mechanical ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Prospective assessment of the feasibility of a trial of low–tidal volume ventilation for patients with acute respiratory failure. / Lanspa, Michael J.; Gong, Michelle Ng; Schoenfeld, David A.; Lee, Kathleen Tiffany; Grissom, Colin K.; Hou, Peter C.; Serpa-Neto, Ary; Brown, Samuel M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Yealy, Donald M.; Hough, Catherine L.; Brower, Roy G.; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Hyzy, Robert C.; Matthay, Michael A.; Miller, Russell R.; Steingrub, Jay S.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Miller, Chadwick D.; Clemmer, Terry P.; Hendey, Gregory W.; Huang, David T.; Mathews, Kusum S.; Qadir, Nida; Tidswell, Mark.

In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 356-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lanspa, MJ, Gong, MN, Schoenfeld, DA, Lee, KT, Grissom, CK, Hou, PC, Serpa-Neto, A, Brown, SM, Iwashyna, TJ, Yealy, DM, Hough, CL, Brower, RG, Calfee, CS, Hyzy, RC, Matthay, MA, Miller, RR, Steingrub, JS, Thompson, BT, Miller, CD, Clemmer, TP, Hendey, GW, Huang, DT, Mathews, KS, Qadir, N & Tidswell, M 2019, 'Prospective assessment of the feasibility of a trial of low–tidal volume ventilation for patients with acute respiratory failure', Annals of the American Thoracic Society, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 356-362. https://doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201807-459OC
Lanspa, Michael J. ; Gong, Michelle Ng ; Schoenfeld, David A. ; Lee, Kathleen Tiffany ; Grissom, Colin K. ; Hou, Peter C. ; Serpa-Neto, Ary ; Brown, Samuel M. ; Iwashyna, Theodore J. ; Yealy, Donald M. ; Hough, Catherine L. ; Brower, Roy G. ; Calfee, Carolyn S. ; Hyzy, Robert C. ; Matthay, Michael A. ; Miller, Russell R. ; Steingrub, Jay S. ; Thompson, B. Taylor ; Miller, Chadwick D. ; Clemmer, Terry P. ; Hendey, Gregory W. ; Huang, David T. ; Mathews, Kusum S. ; Qadir, Nida ; Tidswell, Mark. / Prospective assessment of the feasibility of a trial of low–tidal volume ventilation for patients with acute respiratory failure. In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society. 2019 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 356-362.
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T1 - Prospective assessment of the feasibility of a trial of low–tidal volume ventilation for patients with acute respiratory failure

AU - Lanspa, Michael J.

AU - Gong, Michelle Ng

AU - Schoenfeld, David A.

AU - Lee, Kathleen Tiffany

AU - Grissom, Colin K.

AU - Hou, Peter C.

AU - Serpa-Neto, Ary

AU - Brown, Samuel M.

AU - Iwashyna, Theodore J.

AU - Yealy, Donald M.

AU - Hough, Catherine L.

AU - Brower, Roy G.

AU - Calfee, Carolyn S.

AU - Hyzy, Robert C.

AU - Matthay, Michael A.

AU - Miller, Russell R.

AU - Steingrub, Jay S.

AU - Thompson, B. Taylor

AU - Miller, Chadwick D.

AU - Clemmer, Terry P.

AU - Hendey, Gregory W.

AU - Huang, David T.

AU - Mathews, Kusum S.

AU - Qadir, Nida

AU - Tidswell, Mark

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KW - Low–tidal volume ventilation

KW - Lung-protective ventilation

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