Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care

Bruce D. Rapkin, Claude Mellins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter addresses challenges involved in disseminating evidence-based interventions to frontline HIV/AIDS care settings, to encourage more high-quality services for families affected by HIV/AIDS. In order to inform this discussion, this chapter examines the many ways in which HIV affects families, the rationale for reaching families through HIV-related service settings, and the many barriers that must be overcome. Next, we provide an overview of the Special Needs Clinic, which offers an exemplary model of a continuum of services organized to support families coping with HIV/AIDS alongside co-morbid medical and mental health problems, poverty, and substance use. Lessons learned at the Special Needs Clinic highlight some inherent difficulties in dissemination of behavioral and psychosocial interventions for families affected by HIV/AIDS, even under the best of circumstances. Next, we turn to results of the Family ACCESS to Care Study, based on interviews with 68 providers, 622 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), and 195 of their family members from 22 different community service agencies in New York City. Findings of this study demonstrate those PLHAs and their family members express high levels of unmet need for marital and family therapy and other family-focused services. Despite relevant training and experience, agency staff members perceive a mismatch between family-focused interventions and agencies' mission. Staff and family members also differ in the priorities they ascribe to different evidence-based interventions. Dissemination research focused on local experimentation and problem solving is needed to overcome challenges, bridge differences in perspectives, and build a strong foundation of support and care for families affected by HIV/AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFamily and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages303-328
Number of pages26
Volume9781461404392
ISBN (Print)9781461404392, 146140438X, 9781461404385
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Fingerprint

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Marital Therapy
Family Therapy
Social Welfare
Poverty
Mental Health
Interviews
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Rapkin, B. D., & Mellins, C. (2012). Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care. In Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment (Vol. 9781461404392, pp. 303-328). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0439-2_15

Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care. / Rapkin, Bruce D.; Mellins, Claude.

Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment. Vol. 9781461404392 Springer New York, 2012. p. 303-328.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rapkin, BD & Mellins, C 2012, Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care. in Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment. vol. 9781461404392, Springer New York, pp. 303-328. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0439-2_15
Rapkin BD, Mellins C. Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care. In Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment. Vol. 9781461404392. Springer New York. 2012. p. 303-328 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0439-2_15
Rapkin, Bruce D. ; Mellins, Claude. / Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care. Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment. Vol. 9781461404392 Springer New York, 2012. pp. 303-328
@inbook{f965bb4341614bacb584e6d3fb5bce8a,
title = "Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care",
abstract = "This chapter addresses challenges involved in disseminating evidence-based interventions to frontline HIV/AIDS care settings, to encourage more high-quality services for families affected by HIV/AIDS. In order to inform this discussion, this chapter examines the many ways in which HIV affects families, the rationale for reaching families through HIV-related service settings, and the many barriers that must be overcome. Next, we provide an overview of the Special Needs Clinic, which offers an exemplary model of a continuum of services organized to support families coping with HIV/AIDS alongside co-morbid medical and mental health problems, poverty, and substance use. Lessons learned at the Special Needs Clinic highlight some inherent difficulties in dissemination of behavioral and psychosocial interventions for families affected by HIV/AIDS, even under the best of circumstances. Next, we turn to results of the Family ACCESS to Care Study, based on interviews with 68 providers, 622 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), and 195 of their family members from 22 different community service agencies in New York City. Findings of this study demonstrate those PLHAs and their family members express high levels of unmet need for marital and family therapy and other family-focused services. Despite relevant training and experience, agency staff members perceive a mismatch between family-focused interventions and agencies' mission. Staff and family members also differ in the priorities they ascribe to different evidence-based interventions. Dissemination research focused on local experimentation and problem solving is needed to overcome challenges, bridge differences in perspectives, and build a strong foundation of support and care for families affected by HIV/AIDS.",
author = "Rapkin, {Bruce D.} and Claude Mellins",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4614-0439-2_15",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781461404392",
volume = "9781461404392",
pages = "303--328",
booktitle = "Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Promoting family-focused evidenced-based practice in frontline HIV/AIDS care

AU - Rapkin, Bruce D.

AU - Mellins, Claude

PY - 2012/11/1

Y1 - 2012/11/1

N2 - This chapter addresses challenges involved in disseminating evidence-based interventions to frontline HIV/AIDS care settings, to encourage more high-quality services for families affected by HIV/AIDS. In order to inform this discussion, this chapter examines the many ways in which HIV affects families, the rationale for reaching families through HIV-related service settings, and the many barriers that must be overcome. Next, we provide an overview of the Special Needs Clinic, which offers an exemplary model of a continuum of services organized to support families coping with HIV/AIDS alongside co-morbid medical and mental health problems, poverty, and substance use. Lessons learned at the Special Needs Clinic highlight some inherent difficulties in dissemination of behavioral and psychosocial interventions for families affected by HIV/AIDS, even under the best of circumstances. Next, we turn to results of the Family ACCESS to Care Study, based on interviews with 68 providers, 622 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), and 195 of their family members from 22 different community service agencies in New York City. Findings of this study demonstrate those PLHAs and their family members express high levels of unmet need for marital and family therapy and other family-focused services. Despite relevant training and experience, agency staff members perceive a mismatch between family-focused interventions and agencies' mission. Staff and family members also differ in the priorities they ascribe to different evidence-based interventions. Dissemination research focused on local experimentation and problem solving is needed to overcome challenges, bridge differences in perspectives, and build a strong foundation of support and care for families affected by HIV/AIDS.

AB - This chapter addresses challenges involved in disseminating evidence-based interventions to frontline HIV/AIDS care settings, to encourage more high-quality services for families affected by HIV/AIDS. In order to inform this discussion, this chapter examines the many ways in which HIV affects families, the rationale for reaching families through HIV-related service settings, and the many barriers that must be overcome. Next, we provide an overview of the Special Needs Clinic, which offers an exemplary model of a continuum of services organized to support families coping with HIV/AIDS alongside co-morbid medical and mental health problems, poverty, and substance use. Lessons learned at the Special Needs Clinic highlight some inherent difficulties in dissemination of behavioral and psychosocial interventions for families affected by HIV/AIDS, even under the best of circumstances. Next, we turn to results of the Family ACCESS to Care Study, based on interviews with 68 providers, 622 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), and 195 of their family members from 22 different community service agencies in New York City. Findings of this study demonstrate those PLHAs and their family members express high levels of unmet need for marital and family therapy and other family-focused services. Despite relevant training and experience, agency staff members perceive a mismatch between family-focused interventions and agencies' mission. Staff and family members also differ in the priorities they ascribe to different evidence-based interventions. Dissemination research focused on local experimentation and problem solving is needed to overcome challenges, bridge differences in perspectives, and build a strong foundation of support and care for families affected by HIV/AIDS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949179352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949179352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4614-0439-2_15

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4614-0439-2_15

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781461404392

SN - 146140438X

SN - 9781461404385

VL - 9781461404392

SP - 303

EP - 328

BT - Family and HIV/AIDS: Cultural and Contextual Issues in Prevention and Treatment

PB - Springer New York

ER -