Promoters and barriers to fruit, vegetable, and fast-food consumption among Urban, lowincome African Americans-a qualitative approach

Sean C. Lucan, Frances K. Barg, Judith A. Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To identify promoters of and barriers to fruit, vegetable, and fast-food consumption, we interviewed low-income African Americans in Philadelphia. Salient promoters and barriers were distinct from each other and differed by food type: taste was a promoter and cost a barrier to all foods; convenience, cravings, and preferences promoted consumption of fast foods; health concerns promoted consumption of fruits and vegetables and avoidance of fast foods. Promoters and barriers differed by gender and age. Strategies for dietary change should consider food type, gender, and age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-635
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Fast Foods
African Americans
Vegetables
Fruit
Food
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Promoters and barriers to fruit, vegetable, and fast-food consumption among Urban, lowincome African Americans-a qualitative approach. / Lucan, Sean C.; Barg, Frances K.; Long, Judith A.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 4, 01.04.2010, p. 631-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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