Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling

Søren T. Christensen, Christian A. Clement, Peter Satir, Lotte B. Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-184
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Pathology
Volume226
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Cilia
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Microtubules
Organelles
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • cell cycle control
  • cell differentiation
  • cell migration
  • EGFR
  • FGFR
  • IGF1R
  • PDGFRα
  • primary cilia
  • receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)
  • signal transduction and crosstalk
  • signalling networking
  • Tie1/2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Christensen, S. T., Clement, C. A., Satir, P., & Pedersen, L. B. (2012). Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling. Journal of Pathology, 226(2), 172-184. https://doi.org/10.1002/path.3004

Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling. / Christensen, Søren T.; Clement, Christian A.; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B.

In: Journal of Pathology, Vol. 226, No. 2, 01.2012, p. 172-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christensen, ST, Clement, CA, Satir, P & Pedersen, LB 2012, 'Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling', Journal of Pathology, vol. 226, no. 2, pp. 172-184. https://doi.org/10.1002/path.3004
Christensen, Søren T. ; Clement, Christian A. ; Satir, Peter ; Pedersen, Lotte B. / Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling. In: Journal of Pathology. 2012 ; Vol. 226, No. 2. pp. 172-184.
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