Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among hispanics/latinos of diverse background

The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Gerardo Heiss, Michelle L. Snyder, Yanping Teng, Neil Schneiderman, Maria M. Llabre, Catherine Cowie, Mercedes Carnethon, Robert C. Kaplan, Aida Giachello, Linda Gallo, Laura Loehr, Larissa Avilés-Santa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Approximately one-third of the adult U.S. population has the metabolic syndrome. Its prevalence is the highest among Hispanic adults, but variation by Hispanic/Latino background is unknown. Our objective was to quantify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among men and women 18-74 years of age of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Two-stage area probability sample of households in four U.S. locales, yielding 16,319 adults (52% women) who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, or South American. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2009 Joint Scientific Statement. The main outcome measures were age-standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome per the harmonized American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition and its component abnormalities. RESULTS: The metabolic syndrome was present in 36% of women and 34% of men. Differences in the age-standardized prevalence were seen by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among those 18-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years of age was 23%, 50%, and 62%, respectively, among women; and 25%, 43%, and 55%, respectively, among men. Among women, the metabolic syndrome prevalence ranged from 27% in South Americans to 41% in Puerto Ricans. Among men, prevalences ranged from 27% in South Americans to 35% in Cubans. In those with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity was present in 96% of the women compared with 73% of the men; more men (73%) than women (62%) had hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of cardiometabolic abnormalities is highin Hispanic/Latinos but varies by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. Hispanics/Latinos are thus at increased, but modifiable, predicted lifetime risk of diabetes and its cardiovascular sequelae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2391-2399
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Hispanic Americans
Health
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Sampling Studies
Hyperglycemia
Research Design
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Heiss, G., Snyder, M. L., Teng, Y., Schneiderman, N., Llabre, M. M., Cowie, C., ... Avilés-Santa, L. (2014). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among hispanics/latinos of diverse background: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Diabetes Care, 37(8), 2391-2399. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc13-2505

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among hispanics/latinos of diverse background : The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. / Heiss, Gerardo; Snyder, Michelle L.; Teng, Yanping; Schneiderman, Neil; Llabre, Maria M.; Cowie, Catherine; Carnethon, Mercedes; Kaplan, Robert C.; Giachello, Aida; Gallo, Linda; Loehr, Laura; Avilés-Santa, Larissa.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 37, No. 8, 2014, p. 2391-2399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heiss, G, Snyder, ML, Teng, Y, Schneiderman, N, Llabre, MM, Cowie, C, Carnethon, M, Kaplan, RC, Giachello, A, Gallo, L, Loehr, L & Avilés-Santa, L 2014, 'Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among hispanics/latinos of diverse background: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos', Diabetes Care, vol. 37, no. 8, pp. 2391-2399. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc13-2505
Heiss, Gerardo ; Snyder, Michelle L. ; Teng, Yanping ; Schneiderman, Neil ; Llabre, Maria M. ; Cowie, Catherine ; Carnethon, Mercedes ; Kaplan, Robert C. ; Giachello, Aida ; Gallo, Linda ; Loehr, Laura ; Avilés-Santa, Larissa. / Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among hispanics/latinos of diverse background : The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. In: Diabetes Care. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 2391-2399.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Approximately one-third of the adult U.S. population has the metabolic syndrome. Its prevalence is the highest among Hispanic adults, but variation by Hispanic/Latino background is unknown. Our objective was to quantify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among men and women 18-74 years of age of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Two-stage area probability sample of households in four U.S. locales, yielding 16,319 adults (52{\%} women) who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, or South American. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2009 Joint Scientific Statement. The main outcome measures were age-standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome per the harmonized American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition and its component abnormalities. RESULTS: The metabolic syndrome was present in 36{\%} of women and 34{\%} of men. Differences in the age-standardized prevalence were seen by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among those 18-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years of age was 23{\%}, 50{\%}, and 62{\%}, respectively, among women; and 25{\%}, 43{\%}, and 55{\%}, respectively, among men. Among women, the metabolic syndrome prevalence ranged from 27{\%} in South Americans to 41{\%} in Puerto Ricans. Among men, prevalences ranged from 27{\%} in South Americans to 35{\%} in Cubans. In those with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity was present in 96{\%} of the women compared with 73{\%} of the men; more men (73{\%}) than women (62{\%}) had hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of cardiometabolic abnormalities is highin Hispanic/Latinos but varies by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. Hispanics/Latinos are thus at increased, but modifiable, predicted lifetime risk of diabetes and its cardiovascular sequelae.",
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AU - Schneiderman, Neil

AU - Llabre, Maria M.

AU - Cowie, Catherine

AU - Carnethon, Mercedes

AU - Kaplan, Robert C.

AU - Giachello, Aida

AU - Gallo, Linda

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AU - Avilés-Santa, Larissa

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Approximately one-third of the adult U.S. population has the metabolic syndrome. Its prevalence is the highest among Hispanic adults, but variation by Hispanic/Latino background is unknown. Our objective was to quantify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among men and women 18-74 years of age of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Two-stage area probability sample of households in four U.S. locales, yielding 16,319 adults (52% women) who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, or South American. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2009 Joint Scientific Statement. The main outcome measures were age-standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome per the harmonized American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition and its component abnormalities. RESULTS: The metabolic syndrome was present in 36% of women and 34% of men. Differences in the age-standardized prevalence were seen by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among those 18-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years of age was 23%, 50%, and 62%, respectively, among women; and 25%, 43%, and 55%, respectively, among men. Among women, the metabolic syndrome prevalence ranged from 27% in South Americans to 41% in Puerto Ricans. Among men, prevalences ranged from 27% in South Americans to 35% in Cubans. In those with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity was present in 96% of the women compared with 73% of the men; more men (73%) than women (62%) had hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of cardiometabolic abnormalities is highin Hispanic/Latinos but varies by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. Hispanics/Latinos are thus at increased, but modifiable, predicted lifetime risk of diabetes and its cardiovascular sequelae.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Approximately one-third of the adult U.S. population has the metabolic syndrome. Its prevalence is the highest among Hispanic adults, but variation by Hispanic/Latino background is unknown. Our objective was to quantify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among men and women 18-74 years of age of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Two-stage area probability sample of households in four U.S. locales, yielding 16,319 adults (52% women) who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American, or South American. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2009 Joint Scientific Statement. The main outcome measures were age-standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome per the harmonized American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition and its component abnormalities. RESULTS: The metabolic syndrome was present in 36% of women and 34% of men. Differences in the age-standardized prevalence were seen by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among those 18-44, 45-64, and 65-74 years of age was 23%, 50%, and 62%, respectively, among women; and 25%, 43%, and 55%, respectively, among men. Among women, the metabolic syndrome prevalence ranged from 27% in South Americans to 41% in Puerto Ricans. Among men, prevalences ranged from 27% in South Americans to 35% in Cubans. In those with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity was present in 96% of the women compared with 73% of the men; more men (73%) than women (62%) had hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of cardiometabolic abnormalities is highin Hispanic/Latinos but varies by age, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background. Hispanics/Latinos are thus at increased, but modifiable, predicted lifetime risk of diabetes and its cardiovascular sequelae.

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