Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan Women

Christina M. Wyatt, Qiuhu Shi, James E. Novak, Donald R. Hoover, Lynda Szczech, Jules Semahore Mugabo, Agnes Binagwaho, Mardge Cohen, Eugene Mutimura, Kathryn Anastos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In the United States, HIV-related kidney disease disproportionately affects individuals of African descent; however, there are few estimates of kidney disease prevalence in Africa. We evaluated the prevalence of kidney disease among HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women. Methods: The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment prospectively enrolled 936 women. Associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and proteinuria were assessed in separate logistic regression models. Results: Among 891 non-pregnant women with available data, 2.4% had an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation, MDRD eGFR) and 8.7% had proteinuria ≥1+. The prevalence of decreased eGFR varied markedly depending on the estimating method used, with the highest prevalence by Cockcroft-Gault. Regardless of the method used to estimate GFR, the proportion with decreased eGFR or proteinuria did not differ significantly between HIV-infected and -uninfected women in unadjusted analysis. After adjusting for age and blood pressure, HIV infection was associated with significantly higher odds of decreased MDRD eGFR but not proteinuria. Conclusion: In a well-characterized cohort of Rwandan women, HIV infection was associated with decreased MDRD eGFR. The prevalence of decreased eGFR among HIV-infected women in our study was lower than that previously reported in African-Americans and in other Central and East African HIV populations, although there was substantial variability depending on the equation used to estimate GFR. Future studies are needed to optimize GFR estimates and to determine the impact of antiretroviral therapy on kidney disease in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere18352
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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glomerular filtration rate
Kidney Diseases
kidney diseases
Glomerular Filtration Rate
HIV
Proteinuria
HIV infections
HIV Infections
Logistic Models
Diet Therapy
disease prevalence
Blood pressure
African Americans
Nutrition
Population
blood pressure
Logistics
methodology
Blood Pressure
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wyatt, C. M., Shi, Q., Novak, J. E., Hoover, D. R., Szczech, L., Mugabo, J. S., ... Anastos, K. (2011). Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan Women. PLoS One, 6(3), [e18352]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018352

Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan Women. / Wyatt, Christina M.; Shi, Qiuhu; Novak, James E.; Hoover, Donald R.; Szczech, Lynda; Mugabo, Jules Semahore; Binagwaho, Agnes; Cohen, Mardge; Mutimura, Eugene; Anastos, Kathryn.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 3, e18352, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wyatt, CM, Shi, Q, Novak, JE, Hoover, DR, Szczech, L, Mugabo, JS, Binagwaho, A, Cohen, M, Mutimura, E & Anastos, K 2011, 'Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan Women', PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 3, e18352. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018352
Wyatt CM, Shi Q, Novak JE, Hoover DR, Szczech L, Mugabo JS et al. Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan Women. PLoS One. 2011;6(3). e18352. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0018352
Wyatt, Christina M. ; Shi, Qiuhu ; Novak, James E. ; Hoover, Donald R. ; Szczech, Lynda ; Mugabo, Jules Semahore ; Binagwaho, Agnes ; Cohen, Mardge ; Mutimura, Eugene ; Anastos, Kathryn. / Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan Women. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 3.
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