Prevalence, incidence, and type-specific persistence of human papillomavirus in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women

L. Ahdieh, R. S. Klein, Robert D. Burk, S. Cu-Uvin, P. Schuman, A. Duerr, M. Safaeian, J. Astemborski, R. Daniel, K. Shah

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Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and related immunosuppression are associated with excess risk for cervical neoplasia and human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence. Type-specific HPV infection was assessed at 6-month intervals for HIV-positive and HIV-negative women (median follow-up, 2.5 and 2.9 years, respectively). The type-specific incidence of HPV infection was determined, and risk factors for HPV persistence were investigated by statistical methods that accounted for repeated measurements. HIV-positive women were 1.8, 2.1, and 2.7 times more likely to have high-, intermediate-, and low-risk HPV infections, respectively, compared with HIV-negative women. In multivariate analysis, high viral signal, but not viral risk category, was independently associated with persistence among HIV-positive subjects (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-2.9). Furthermore, persistence was 1.9 (95% CI, 1.5-2.3) times greater if the subject had a CD4 cell count <200 cells/μL (vs. >500 cells/μL). Thus, HIV infection and immunosuppression play an important role in modulating the natural history of HPV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)682-690
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume184
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2001

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HIV
Papillomavirus Infections
Incidence
Virus Diseases
Immunosuppression
Confidence Intervals
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Natural History
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Prevalence, incidence, and type-specific persistence of human papillomavirus in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women. / Ahdieh, L.; Klein, R. S.; Burk, Robert D.; Cu-Uvin, S.; Schuman, P.; Duerr, A.; Safaeian, M.; Astemborski, J.; Daniel, R.; Shah, K.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 184, No. 6, 15.09.2001, p. 682-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahdieh, L, Klein, RS, Burk, RD, Cu-Uvin, S, Schuman, P, Duerr, A, Safaeian, M, Astemborski, J, Daniel, R & Shah, K 2001, 'Prevalence, incidence, and type-specific persistence of human papillomavirus in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 184, no. 6, pp. 682-690. https://doi.org/10.1086/323081
Ahdieh, L. ; Klein, R. S. ; Burk, Robert D. ; Cu-Uvin, S. ; Schuman, P. ; Duerr, A. ; Safaeian, M. ; Astemborski, J. ; Daniel, R. ; Shah, K. / Prevalence, incidence, and type-specific persistence of human papillomavirus in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Vol. 184, No. 6. pp. 682-690.
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