Prevalence and Risk Factors for Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Palsy in the Beach Chair Position

Ari J. Holtzman, Christopher D. Glezos, Eric J. Feit, Konrad I. Gruson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To report on the prevalence of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) palsy in patients who had undergone shoulder surgery in the beach chair position and to identify patient and surgical risk factors for its development. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 397 consecutive patients who underwent either open or arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position by a single surgeon. Patient demographic and surgical data including age, gender, weight, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, procedure duration, and anesthesia type (general, regional, regional/general) were recorded. LFCN palsy symptoms were recorded prospectively at the initial postoperative visit and identified clinically by focal pain, numbness, and/or tingling over the anterolateral thigh. Results: The median patient age was 59.0 years and consisted of 158 males (40%) and 239 (60%) females. Five cases of LFCN palsy were identified for a prevalence of 1.3%. These patients had a higher median weight (108.9 kg vs 80.7 kg, P = .005) and BMI (39.6 vs 29.4, P = .005) than the patients who did not develop LFCN palsy. Median age, gender, diabetes, and surgical time were not significantly different between the groups. All cases resolved completely within 6 months. Conclusions: LFCN palsy after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position in our study has a prevalence of 1.3%, making it an uncommon complication. Patients with elevated BMI should be counseled about its possible occurrence after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Femoral Nerve
Paralysis
Skin
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
Conduction Anesthesia
Hypesthesia
Arthroscopy
Operative Time
Thigh
General Anesthesia
Medical Records
Demography
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Prevalence and Risk Factors for Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Palsy in the Beach Chair Position. / Holtzman, Ari J.; Glezos, Christopher D.; Feit, Eric J.; Gruson, Konrad I.

In: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To report on the prevalence of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) palsy in patients who had undergone shoulder surgery in the beach chair position and to identify patient and surgical risk factors for its development. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 397 consecutive patients who underwent either open or arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position by a single surgeon. Patient demographic and surgical data including age, gender, weight, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, procedure duration, and anesthesia type (general, regional, regional/general) were recorded. LFCN palsy symptoms were recorded prospectively at the initial postoperative visit and identified clinically by focal pain, numbness, and/or tingling over the anterolateral thigh. Results: The median patient age was 59.0 years and consisted of 158 males (40{\%}) and 239 (60{\%}) females. Five cases of LFCN palsy were identified for a prevalence of 1.3{\%}. These patients had a higher median weight (108.9 kg vs 80.7 kg, P = .005) and BMI (39.6 vs 29.4, P = .005) than the patients who did not develop LFCN palsy. Median age, gender, diabetes, and surgical time were not significantly different between the groups. All cases resolved completely within 6 months. Conclusions: LFCN palsy after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position in our study has a prevalence of 1.3{\%}, making it an uncommon complication. Patients with elevated BMI should be counseled about its possible occurrence after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic.",
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N2 - Purpose: To report on the prevalence of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) palsy in patients who had undergone shoulder surgery in the beach chair position and to identify patient and surgical risk factors for its development. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 397 consecutive patients who underwent either open or arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position by a single surgeon. Patient demographic and surgical data including age, gender, weight, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, procedure duration, and anesthesia type (general, regional, regional/general) were recorded. LFCN palsy symptoms were recorded prospectively at the initial postoperative visit and identified clinically by focal pain, numbness, and/or tingling over the anterolateral thigh. Results: The median patient age was 59.0 years and consisted of 158 males (40%) and 239 (60%) females. Five cases of LFCN palsy were identified for a prevalence of 1.3%. These patients had a higher median weight (108.9 kg vs 80.7 kg, P = .005) and BMI (39.6 vs 29.4, P = .005) than the patients who did not develop LFCN palsy. Median age, gender, diabetes, and surgical time were not significantly different between the groups. All cases resolved completely within 6 months. Conclusions: LFCN palsy after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position in our study has a prevalence of 1.3%, making it an uncommon complication. Patients with elevated BMI should be counseled about its possible occurrence after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic.

AB - Purpose: To report on the prevalence of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) palsy in patients who had undergone shoulder surgery in the beach chair position and to identify patient and surgical risk factors for its development. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 397 consecutive patients who underwent either open or arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach chair position by a single surgeon. Patient demographic and surgical data including age, gender, weight, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, procedure duration, and anesthesia type (general, regional, regional/general) were recorded. LFCN palsy symptoms were recorded prospectively at the initial postoperative visit and identified clinically by focal pain, numbness, and/or tingling over the anterolateral thigh. Results: The median patient age was 59.0 years and consisted of 158 males (40%) and 239 (60%) females. Five cases of LFCN palsy were identified for a prevalence of 1.3%. These patients had a higher median weight (108.9 kg vs 80.7 kg, P = .005) and BMI (39.6 vs 29.4, P = .005) than the patients who did not develop LFCN palsy. Median age, gender, diabetes, and surgical time were not significantly different between the groups. All cases resolved completely within 6 months. Conclusions: LFCN palsy after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position in our study has a prevalence of 1.3%, making it an uncommon complication. Patients with elevated BMI should be counseled about its possible occurrence after shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Level of Evidence: Level IV, prognostic.

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