Prescription monitoring programs and emergency department visits involving opioids, 2004-2011

Brandon C. Maughan, Marcus A. Bachhuber, Nandita Mitra, Joanna L. Starrels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the association between prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) implementation and emergency department (ED) visits involving opioid analgesics. Methods: Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics per 100,000 residents were estimated from the Drug Abuse Warning Network dataset for 11 geographically diverse metropolitan areas in the United States on a quarterly basis from 2004 to 2011. Generalized estimating equations assessed whether implementation of a prescriber-accessible PDMP was associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics. Models were adjusted for calendar quarter, metropolitan area, metropolitan area-specific linear time trends, and unemployment rate. Results: Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics increased in all metropolitan areas. PDMP implementation was not associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics (mean difference of 0.8 visits [95% CI: -3.7 to 5.2] per 100,000 residents per quarter). Conclusions: During 2004-2011, PDMP implementation was not associated with a change in opioid-related morbidity, as measured by emergency department visits involving opioid analgesics. Urgent investigation is needed to determine the optimal PDMP structure and capabilities to improve opioid analgesic safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5753
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume156
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Keywords

  • Emergency departments
  • Opioids
  • Prescription drug abuse
  • Prescription drug monitoring programs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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