Prepare for conflict: EEG correlates of the anticipation of target competition during overt and covert shifts of visual attention

Simon P. Kelly, John J. Foxe, Geoffrey Newman, Jay A. Edelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When preparing to make a saccadic eye movement in a cued direction, perception of stimuli at the target location is enhanced, just as it is when attention is covertly deployed there. Accordingly, the timing and anatomical sources of preparatory brain activity accompanying shifts of covert attention and saccade preparation tend to exhibit a large degree of overlap. However, there is evidence that preparatory processes are modulated by the foreknowledge of visual distractor competition during covert attention, and it is unknown whether eye movement preparation undergoes equivalent modulation. Here we examine preparatory processes in the electroencephalogram of human participants during four blocked versions of a spatial cueing task, requiring either covert detection or saccade execution, and either containing a distractor or not. As in previous work, a typical pattern of spatially selective occipital, parietal and frontal activity was seen in all task versions. However, whereas distractor presence called on an enhancement of spatially selective visual cortical modulation during covert attention, it instead called on increased activity over frontomedial oculomotor areas in the case of overt saccade preparation. We conclude that, although advance orienting signals may be similar in character during overt and covert conditions, the pattern by which these signals are modulated to ameliorate the behavioral costs of distractor competition is highly distinct, pointing to a degree of separability between the overt and covert systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1690-1700
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Saccades
Electroencephalography
Eye Movements
Costs and Cost Analysis
Conflict (Psychology)
Brain

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Electroencephalography
  • Human
  • Saccade
  • Spatial cue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prepare for conflict : EEG correlates of the anticipation of target competition during overt and covert shifts of visual attention. / Kelly, Simon P.; Foxe, John J.; Newman, Geoffrey; Edelman, Jay A.

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 31, No. 9, 2010, p. 1690-1700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kelly, Simon P. ; Foxe, John J. ; Newman, Geoffrey ; Edelman, Jay A. / Prepare for conflict : EEG correlates of the anticipation of target competition during overt and covert shifts of visual attention. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 9. pp. 1690-1700.
@article{d0b72b27fddb4e60813caec40d60ff02,
title = "Prepare for conflict: EEG correlates of the anticipation of target competition during overt and covert shifts of visual attention",
abstract = "When preparing to make a saccadic eye movement in a cued direction, perception of stimuli at the target location is enhanced, just as it is when attention is covertly deployed there. Accordingly, the timing and anatomical sources of preparatory brain activity accompanying shifts of covert attention and saccade preparation tend to exhibit a large degree of overlap. However, there is evidence that preparatory processes are modulated by the foreknowledge of visual distractor competition during covert attention, and it is unknown whether eye movement preparation undergoes equivalent modulation. Here we examine preparatory processes in the electroencephalogram of human participants during four blocked versions of a spatial cueing task, requiring either covert detection or saccade execution, and either containing a distractor or not. As in previous work, a typical pattern of spatially selective occipital, parietal and frontal activity was seen in all task versions. However, whereas distractor presence called on an enhancement of spatially selective visual cortical modulation during covert attention, it instead called on increased activity over frontomedial oculomotor areas in the case of overt saccade preparation. We conclude that, although advance orienting signals may be similar in character during overt and covert conditions, the pattern by which these signals are modulated to ameliorate the behavioral costs of distractor competition is highly distinct, pointing to a degree of separability between the overt and covert systems.",
keywords = "Attention, Electroencephalography, Human, Saccade, Spatial cue",
author = "Kelly, {Simon P.} and Foxe, {John J.} and Geoffrey Newman and Edelman, {Jay A.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07219.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "1690--1700",
journal = "European Journal of Neuroscience",
issn = "0953-816X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prepare for conflict

T2 - EEG correlates of the anticipation of target competition during overt and covert shifts of visual attention

AU - Kelly, Simon P.

AU - Foxe, John J.

AU - Newman, Geoffrey

AU - Edelman, Jay A.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - When preparing to make a saccadic eye movement in a cued direction, perception of stimuli at the target location is enhanced, just as it is when attention is covertly deployed there. Accordingly, the timing and anatomical sources of preparatory brain activity accompanying shifts of covert attention and saccade preparation tend to exhibit a large degree of overlap. However, there is evidence that preparatory processes are modulated by the foreknowledge of visual distractor competition during covert attention, and it is unknown whether eye movement preparation undergoes equivalent modulation. Here we examine preparatory processes in the electroencephalogram of human participants during four blocked versions of a spatial cueing task, requiring either covert detection or saccade execution, and either containing a distractor or not. As in previous work, a typical pattern of spatially selective occipital, parietal and frontal activity was seen in all task versions. However, whereas distractor presence called on an enhancement of spatially selective visual cortical modulation during covert attention, it instead called on increased activity over frontomedial oculomotor areas in the case of overt saccade preparation. We conclude that, although advance orienting signals may be similar in character during overt and covert conditions, the pattern by which these signals are modulated to ameliorate the behavioral costs of distractor competition is highly distinct, pointing to a degree of separability between the overt and covert systems.

AB - When preparing to make a saccadic eye movement in a cued direction, perception of stimuli at the target location is enhanced, just as it is when attention is covertly deployed there. Accordingly, the timing and anatomical sources of preparatory brain activity accompanying shifts of covert attention and saccade preparation tend to exhibit a large degree of overlap. However, there is evidence that preparatory processes are modulated by the foreknowledge of visual distractor competition during covert attention, and it is unknown whether eye movement preparation undergoes equivalent modulation. Here we examine preparatory processes in the electroencephalogram of human participants during four blocked versions of a spatial cueing task, requiring either covert detection or saccade execution, and either containing a distractor or not. As in previous work, a typical pattern of spatially selective occipital, parietal and frontal activity was seen in all task versions. However, whereas distractor presence called on an enhancement of spatially selective visual cortical modulation during covert attention, it instead called on increased activity over frontomedial oculomotor areas in the case of overt saccade preparation. We conclude that, although advance orienting signals may be similar in character during overt and covert conditions, the pattern by which these signals are modulated to ameliorate the behavioral costs of distractor competition is highly distinct, pointing to a degree of separability between the overt and covert systems.

KW - Attention

KW - Electroencephalography

KW - Human

KW - Saccade

KW - Spatial cue

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951838969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951838969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07219.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07219.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 20525082

AN - SCOPUS:77951838969

VL - 31

SP - 1690

EP - 1700

JO - European Journal of Neuroscience

JF - European Journal of Neuroscience

SN - 0953-816X

IS - 9

ER -