Predictors of Non-Attendance to the Postpartum Follow-up Visit

Annemieke Wilcox, Erika E. Levi, Joanne M. Garrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives This study aimed to measure the incidence and identify predictors of postpartum visit non-attendance, using medical records of women who received prenatal care and went on to deliver live births at Montefiore Hospital in 2013. Methods Pearson’s Chi square tests were used to assess the association between maternal demographics, insurance status, and delivery information with non-attendance of a postpartum visit. Logistic regression and modified Poisson regression models were then used to identify statistically significant predictors of postpartum visit non-attendance. Results We found that one-third of all women who attended a prenatal visit at Montefiore Hospital did not return for a postpartum visit. Variables significantly associated with non-attendance include having Medicaid or no insurance (RR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.2–1.6), being Hispanic or Latino (RR 1.2, 95 % CI 1.1–1.3), having a vaginal delivery (RR 1.2, 95 % CI 1.1–1.4), and age <20 years (RR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.64–0.92). Conclusions for Practice We conclude that the risk of postpartum visit non-attendance disproportionately impacts socially and economically vulnerable patients who are: younger, part of a minority ethnic background, and depend on state funded health insurance. Our results highlight the disparity in access to postpartum care and the importance of identifying barriers to attendance as well as developing creative strategies of providing postpartum care outside of the traditional postpartum visit framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 25 2016

Fingerprint

Postpartum Period
Postnatal Care
Hispanic Americans
Insurance Coverage
Prenatal Care
Medicaid
Live Birth
Chi-Square Distribution
Health Insurance
Insurance
Medical Records
Logistic Models
Mothers
Demography
Incidence

Keywords

  • Follow-up
  • Non-attendance
  • Postpartum visit
  • Predictors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Predictors of Non-Attendance to the Postpartum Follow-up Visit. / Wilcox, Annemieke; Levi, Erika E.; Garrett, Joanne M.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, 25.08.2016, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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