Potential for donation after circulatory death heart transplantation in the United States: Retrospective analysis of a limited UNOS dataset

Maryjane Farr, Lauren K. Truby, Joel Lindower, Ulrich Jorde, Samantha Taylor, Leway Chen, Alan Gass, Gerin Stevens, Alex Reyentovich, Donna Mancini, Selim Arcasoy, Samantha Delair, Sean Pinney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Donation after Circulatory Death (DCD) is an alternative to Donation after Brain death (DBD), and is a growing strategy for organ procurement in the United States(US). The purpose of this analysis was to review the number and quality of hearts in one United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Region that were not utilized as a potential consequence of nonheart DCD donation. We retrospectively identified all successful US DCD solid organ donors from 1/2011 to 3/1/2017, defined an ideal heart donor by age and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and then reviewed the donor charts of unused hearts in New York and Vermont (UNOS Region 9). Of 8302 successful DCD donors across the United States, 5033 (61%) were between 18 and 49 years of age, and 872 had a screening echocardiogram, with 573 (66%) measuring an EF >50%. Of these 573 potential donors, 44 (7.7%) were from Region 9. Detailed donor chart review identified 36 ideal heart donors, 24 (66.7%) with anoxic brain injury. Trends in Region 9 DCD donation increased from 4 unused hearts in 2011, to 13 in 2016. In the context of severe organ scarcity, these data indicate that implementation of DCD heart transplantation in the United States would improve overall donation rates and provide a pathway to utilize these ideal donor hearts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-529
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • clinical research/practice
  • donors and donation: donation after circulatory death (DCD)
  • donors and donation: donor evaluation
  • donors and donation: extended criteria
  • ethics and public policy
  • heart transplantation/cardiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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