Postdischarge medication compliance of inpatients converted from an oral to a depot neuroleptic regimen

P. Weiden, Bruce D. Rapkin, A. Zygmunt, T. Mort, D. Goldman, A. Frances

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This preliminary study assessed the effects on outpatient medication compliance of converting inpatients with schizophrenia from oral to depot neuroleptic medication. Methods: Subjects consisted of 93 neuroleptic-responsive inpatients with schizophrenia from three New York City hospitals who were part of a one-year prospective longitudinal study of medication compliance. Forty patients were converted to depot neuroleptic medication while hospitalized; the other 53 remained on oral medication. Symptoms, side effects, and medication compliance of the two groups were compared at one, six, and 12 months postdischarge. Results: Inpatients converted to depot medication had significantly better compliance at one month postdischarge. Differences in demographic characteristics, symptoms, hospital site, and baseline attitudes toward medication did not account for this finding. The initial positive effect on compliance waned, and no significant between-group differences in compliance were found at six and 12 months postdischarge. Conclusions: Conversion to depot medication before hospital discharge may facilitate medication compliance during transition to outpatient treatment, but other interventions are needed to maintain compliance over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1049-1054
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume46
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
Antipsychotic Agents
Compliance
Inpatients
medication
Schizophrenia
Outpatients
Urban Hospitals
Longitudinal Studies
schizophrenia
Demography
Prospective Studies
outpatient treatment
longitudinal study
Group
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Weiden, P., Rapkin, B. D., Zygmunt, A., Mort, T., Goldman, D., & Frances, A. (1995). Postdischarge medication compliance of inpatients converted from an oral to a depot neuroleptic regimen. Psychiatric Services, 46(10), 1049-1054.

Postdischarge medication compliance of inpatients converted from an oral to a depot neuroleptic regimen. / Weiden, P.; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Zygmunt, A.; Mort, T.; Goldman, D.; Frances, A.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 46, No. 10, 1995, p. 1049-1054.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiden, P, Rapkin, BD, Zygmunt, A, Mort, T, Goldman, D & Frances, A 1995, 'Postdischarge medication compliance of inpatients converted from an oral to a depot neuroleptic regimen', Psychiatric Services, vol. 46, no. 10, pp. 1049-1054.
Weiden, P. ; Rapkin, Bruce D. ; Zygmunt, A. ; Mort, T. ; Goldman, D. ; Frances, A. / Postdischarge medication compliance of inpatients converted from an oral to a depot neuroleptic regimen. In: Psychiatric Services. 1995 ; Vol. 46, No. 10. pp. 1049-1054.
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