Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders arising in solid organ transplant recipients are usually of recipient origin

A. Chadburn, N. Suciu-Foca, E. Cesarman, E. Reed, Robert E. Michler, D. R. Knowles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent clinical, pathological, and molecular studies have increased our understanding of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PT- LPDs). Studies have shown that the majority of PT-LPDs arising in hone marrow transplant recipients are of donor origin; however, the source (host or donor) of the lymphoid cells that make up PT-LPDs arising in solid organ transplant recipients has not been systemically investigated. In this study, 18 PT-LPDs occurring in 16 organ transplant recipients (13 heart, 2 kidney, 1 lung), 9 donor tissues (for 10 recipients), and 14 uninvolved recipient tissues (from 12 patients) were examined employing restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to determine their host or donor origin. The PstI-digested DNAs were analyzed by Southern blot hybridization using two highly informative polymorphic probes that map to chromosome 21 (CRI-PAT- pL427-4) and chromosome 7 (CRI-PAT-pS194). All solid organ PT-LPDs with corresponding uninvolved recipient DNA showed identical hybridization patterns; none of the PT-LPDs exhibited a hybridization pattern that matched donor DNA. These findings suggest that the vast majority of PT-LPDs arising in solid organ transplant recipients, in contrast to those arising in bone marrow transplant recipients, are of recipient origin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1862-1870
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume147
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Transplants
DNA
Bone Marrow
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7
Southern Blotting
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Transplant Recipients
Lymphocytes
Kidney
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders arising in solid organ transplant recipients are usually of recipient origin. / Chadburn, A.; Suciu-Foca, N.; Cesarman, E.; Reed, E.; Michler, Robert E.; Knowles, D. R.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 147, No. 6, 1995, p. 1862-1870.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chadburn, A. ; Suciu-Foca, N. ; Cesarman, E. ; Reed, E. ; Michler, Robert E. ; Knowles, D. R. / Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders arising in solid organ transplant recipients are usually of recipient origin. In: American Journal of Pathology. 1995 ; Vol. 147, No. 6. pp. 1862-1870.
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