Polysaccharide-containing conjugate vaccines for fungal diseases

Arturo Casadevall, Liise-anne Pirofski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recognition that antibodies are effective against fungal pathogens has spawned interest in developing vaccines that elicit antibody-mediated protection. Recently, a novel polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine that uses the algal antigen laminarin was shown to elicit antibodies to β-glucan in fungal cell walls and to mediate protection against both experimental candidiasis and aspergillosis. Remarkably, vaccine-induced antibodies manifested direct antifungal effects, suggesting that vaccine efficacy might not require cellular or other components of the immune system. The description of a vaccine that could protect against various fungal pathogens opens exciting new dimensions in the search for approaches to control fungal diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-9
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Molecular Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

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Conjugate Vaccines
Mycoses
Polysaccharides
Vaccines
Antibodies
Aspergillosis
Glucans
Candidiasis
Cell Wall
Immune System
Antigens
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Polysaccharide-containing conjugate vaccines for fungal diseases. / Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-anne.

In: Trends in Molecular Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 6-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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