Physical activity-related differences in body mass index and patient-reported quality of life in socioculturally diverse endometrial cancer survivors

Amerigo Rossi, Carol Ewing Garber, Gurpreet Kaur, Xiaonan (Nan) Xue, Gary L. Goldberg, Nicole S. Nevadunsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe physical activity-related differences in body composition, quality of life, and behavioral variables among a socioculturally diverse sample of endometrial cancer survivors. Methods: Ambulatory, English-speaking endometrial cancer survivors (6 months to 5 years post-treatment), who were residents of Bronx, NY, were recruited to complete questionnaires about physical activity (PA), quality of life (QoL), and psychosocial characteristics. Body weight and height were obtained from medical records to determine body mass index (BMI). ANOVA and independent sample t tests were used to determine differences between racial/ethnic groups and active versus insufficiently active, respectively. Results: Sixty-two participants enrolled in the study. Recruitment rate was 7% for mailed questionnaires and 92% in clinic. Mean age was 63 ± 10 years. Sixty-five percent of the sample was obese (mean BMI: 34.2 ± 8.6 kg·m−2). BMI was significantly higher in non-Hispanic black women (37.8 ± 10.2 kg·m−2) than non-Hispanic white women (31.2 ± 7.8 kg·m−2; d = 0.73, p = 0.05). Forty-seven percent reported being physically active, with no differences by race/ethnicity. Physically active endometrial cancer survivors had higher QoL scores (d = 0.57, p = 0.02). There was a moderate effect size for BMI for the active (32.4 ± 5.6 kg·m−2) compared to the insufficiently active group (35.7 ± 10.2 kg·m−2; d = 0.40, p = 0.06). Walking self-efficacy was a significant predictor of physical activity (χ2 = 13.5, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Physically active endometrial cancer survivors reported higher QoL, lower BMI, and more positive walking self-efficacy. These data suggest that a physically active lifestyle has a benefit in socioculturally diverse endometrial cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 16 2017

Fingerprint

Endometrial Neoplasms
Survivors
Body Mass Index
Quality of Life
Exercise
Self Efficacy
Walking
Body Height
Body Composition
Ethnic Groups
Medical Records
Life Style
Analysis of Variance
Body Weight
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Endometrial cancer
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Quality of life
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Physical activity-related differences in body mass index and patient-reported quality of life in socioculturally diverse endometrial cancer survivors. / Rossi, Amerigo; Garber, Carol Ewing; Kaur, Gurpreet; Xue, Xiaonan (Nan); Goldberg, Gary L.; Nevadunsky, Nicole S.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, 16.02.2017, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Garber, Carol Ewing

AU - Kaur, Gurpreet

AU - Xue, Xiaonan (Nan)

AU - Goldberg, Gary L.

AU - Nevadunsky, Nicole S.

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KW - Quality of life

KW - Self-efficacy

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