Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

Richard Bouchard, Nicholas Dana, Luigi Di Biase, Andrea Natale, Stanislav Emelianov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOL® Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a Vevo® 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm 2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume8223
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2012 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 22 2012Jan 24 2012

Other

OtherPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period1/22/121/24/12

Fingerprint

Photoacoustic effect
Ablation
lesions
ablation
Ultrasonography
Lasers
Swine
Imaging techniques
Fluoroscopy
Echocardiography
Cardiac Arrhythmias
arrhythmia
fluoroscopy
echocardiography
Ultrasonics
tunable lasers
Tissue
Ultrasonic imaging
animals
Laser tuning

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrhythmias
  • Lesion imaging
  • Photoacoustic imaging
  • Radiofrequency catheter ablation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Bouchard, R., Dana, N., Di Biase, L., Natale, A., & Emelianov, S. (2012). Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 8223). [82233K] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.909161

Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions. / Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8223 2012. 82233K.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bouchard, R, Dana, N, Di Biase, L, Natale, A & Emelianov, S 2012, Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 8223, 82233K, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2012, San Francisco, CA, United States, 1/22/12. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.909161
Bouchard R, Dana N, Di Biase L, Natale A, Emelianov S. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8223. 2012. 82233K https://doi.org/10.1117/12.909161
Bouchard, Richard ; Dana, Nicholas ; Di Biase, Luigi ; Natale, Andrea ; Emelianov, Stanislav. / Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8223 2012.
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