Phase One Pilot Study Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Predict the Histology of Radiofrequency-Ablated Renal Tissue

Joshua M. Stern, Mathew E. Merritt, Ilia Zeltser, Jay D. Raman, Jeffrey A. Cadeddu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction and Objective: Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) technology have allowed for high-resolution ex vivo spectroscopy on small, intact tissue samples. We examined the capability of 1H magnetic resonance magic angle spinning (MR-MAS) to correctly characterize post-radiofrequency ablation (RFA) renal biopsies from human samples, compared with standard histology and cross-sectional imaging. Methods: A minimum of two, 18G, percutaneous renal biopsies were obtained from ten biopsy-confirmed renal tumors at a mean 26.6 mo (range, 15-48) post-RFA. All patients were considered free of disease by computed tomography criteria. A portion of each sample was immediately frozen at -80 °C for spectroscopy and the remainder used for pathological analysis. 1H MR-MAS was performed blinded with a 14.1-tesla field strength. Prior renal biopsies from nonablated tissue were used as positive controls for the spectral analysis. Concordance between, computed tomography, histology, and MR-MAS was analyzed. All spectroscopy was processed with VNMR software. Results: Histological analysis of all ten post-RFA biopsies demonstrated no cancer or viable tissue. All MR-MAS spectral peaks for each biopsy were consistent with necrosis and, more importantly, indicated an absence of small molecule metabolites characteristic of both normal and malignant renal tissue. Both MR-MAS and histology confirmed, in each case, the conventional computed tomography determination of complete ablation. Conclusions: MR spectroscopy can correctly diagnose the molecular absence of disease in post-RFA tissue biopsies. This proof of principle study warrants in vivo evaluation to confirm the clinical correlates of this modality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-440
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Urology
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Histology
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Kidney
Biopsy
Spectrum Analysis
Tomography
Neoplasms
Necrosis
Software
Technology

Keywords

  • MRI
  • Radiofrequency ablation
  • Renal mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Phase One Pilot Study Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Predict the Histology of Radiofrequency-Ablated Renal Tissue. / Stern, Joshua M.; Merritt, Mathew E.; Zeltser, Ilia; Raman, Jay D.; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.

In: European Urology, Vol. 55, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 433-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stern, Joshua M. ; Merritt, Mathew E. ; Zeltser, Ilia ; Raman, Jay D. ; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A. / Phase One Pilot Study Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Predict the Histology of Radiofrequency-Ablated Renal Tissue. In: European Urology. 2009 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 433-440.
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