Pharmacological treatment strategies in obsessive compulsive disorder: A cross-sectional view in nine international OCD centers

Michael Van Ameringen, William Simpson, Beth Patterson, Bernardo Dell'Osso, Naomi Fineberg, Eric Hollander, Luchezar Hranov, Georgi Hranov, Christine Lochner, Oguz Karamustafalioglu, Donatella Marazziti, Jose M. Menchon, Humberto Nicolini, Stefano Pallanti, Dan J. Stein, Joseph Zohar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: It is unknown what next-step strategies are being used in clinical practice for patients with obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) who do not respond to first-line treatment. As part of a cross-sectional study of OCD, treatment and symptom information was collected. Method: Consecutive OCD out-patients in nine international centers were evaluated by self-report measures and clinical/structured interviews. OCD symptom severity was evaluated by the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) and Clinical Global ImpressionSeverity Scale (CGI-S). Clinical response to current treatment was evaluated by the CGI-Improvement Scale (CGI-I ≤ 2). Results: In total, 361 participants reported taking medication; 77.6% were taking a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; 50% reported use of at least one augmentation strategy. Antipsychotics were most often prescribed as augmenters (30.3%), followed by benzodiazepines (24.9%) and antidepressants (21.9%). No differences in OCD symptom severity were found between patients taking different classes of augmentation agents. Conclusions: Results from this international cross-sectional study indicate that current OCD treatment is in line with evidence-based treatment guidelines. Although augmentation strategies are widely used, no significant differences in OCD symptom severity were found between monotherapy and augmentation or between different therapeutic agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-602
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Pharmacology
Therapeutics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Benzodiazepines
Self Report
Antidepressive Agents
Antipsychotic Agents
Outpatients
Guidelines
Interviews

Keywords

  • augmentation
  • effectiveness
  • international
  • medication
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Pharmacological treatment strategies in obsessive compulsive disorder : A cross-sectional view in nine international OCD centers. / Van Ameringen, Michael; Simpson, William; Patterson, Beth; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fineberg, Naomi; Hollander, Eric; Hranov, Luchezar; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Karamustafalioglu, Oguz; Marazziti, Donatella; Menchon, Jose M.; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Stein, Dan J.; Zohar, Joseph.

In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 28, No. 6, 2014, p. 596-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Ameringen, M, Simpson, W, Patterson, B, Dell'Osso, B, Fineberg, N, Hollander, E, Hranov, L, Hranov, G, Lochner, C, Karamustafalioglu, O, Marazziti, D, Menchon, JM, Nicolini, H, Pallanti, S, Stein, DJ & Zohar, J 2014, 'Pharmacological treatment strategies in obsessive compulsive disorder: A cross-sectional view in nine international OCD centers', Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 596-602. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881113517955
Van Ameringen, Michael ; Simpson, William ; Patterson, Beth ; Dell'Osso, Bernardo ; Fineberg, Naomi ; Hollander, Eric ; Hranov, Luchezar ; Hranov, Georgi ; Lochner, Christine ; Karamustafalioglu, Oguz ; Marazziti, Donatella ; Menchon, Jose M. ; Nicolini, Humberto ; Pallanti, Stefano ; Stein, Dan J. ; Zohar, Joseph. / Pharmacological treatment strategies in obsessive compulsive disorder : A cross-sectional view in nine international OCD centers. In: Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2014 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 596-602.
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