Perioperative Efficiency vs. Quality of Care–Do We Always Have to Choose?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: ATTEMPTS to enforce optimization practices for operating room (OR) efficiency are often interpreted as a “pressure for production” which threatens patient safety. The aim of this study is to assess if and how improvements in OR efficiency affect patient safety and thus the quality of care. Methods: In an attempt to optimize OR efficiency, a new OR management approach “Integrated Practice Improvement Solutions” (IPIS) was developed at the Weiler Division of Montefiore Medical Center in 2011. IPIS is a flexible managerial system based on elements of multiple practice improvement methodologies incorporated into an open source framework. It was implemented in 2012. The data presented covers the period from 2012 through 2014 when the system was temporarily discontinued due to administrative restructuring. Data from 2011 was used as a baseline. The impact of IPIS on patient safety and quality of care was assessed based on quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) Committee reports covering the same period of time. Results: IPIS implementation resulted in an increase in surgical workload by an average of 10.7%, an increase in OR and anesthesia revenues by 18.5% and 6.9%, respectively, and decreases in turnover time by 15% and overtime for the anesthesia staff by 26%. Based on QIPS reports, the total number of complications potentially attributable to “production pressure” was 0.25%, 0.2% and 0.16% in 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively compared to 0.21% in 2011 (p = 0.56). Conclusions: Gradual implementation of a methodologically structured improvement in OR efficiency has no negative impact on patient safety and quality of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Operating Rooms
Patient Safety
Quality of Health Care
Quality Improvement
Anesthesia
Pressure
Workload

Keywords

  • operating room efficiency
  • perioperative management
  • practice improvement methodologies
  • production pressure
  • quality improvement
  • quality of patients care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{94000b0913334ac8bb38bedbf4979c26,
title = "Perioperative Efficiency vs. Quality of Care–Do We Always Have to Choose?",
abstract = "Introduction: ATTEMPTS to enforce optimization practices for operating room (OR) efficiency are often interpreted as a “pressure for production” which threatens patient safety. The aim of this study is to assess if and how improvements in OR efficiency affect patient safety and thus the quality of care. Methods: In an attempt to optimize OR efficiency, a new OR management approach “Integrated Practice Improvement Solutions” (IPIS) was developed at the Weiler Division of Montefiore Medical Center in 2011. IPIS is a flexible managerial system based on elements of multiple practice improvement methodologies incorporated into an open source framework. It was implemented in 2012. The data presented covers the period from 2012 through 2014 when the system was temporarily discontinued due to administrative restructuring. Data from 2011 was used as a baseline. The impact of IPIS on patient safety and quality of care was assessed based on quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) Committee reports covering the same period of time. Results: IPIS implementation resulted in an increase in surgical workload by an average of 10.7{\%}, an increase in OR and anesthesia revenues by 18.5{\%} and 6.9{\%}, respectively, and decreases in turnover time by 15{\%} and overtime for the anesthesia staff by 26{\%}. Based on QIPS reports, the total number of complications potentially attributable to “production pressure” was 0.25{\%}, 0.2{\%} and 0.16{\%} in 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively compared to 0.21{\%} in 2011 (p = 0.56). Conclusions: Gradual implementation of a methodologically structured improvement in OR efficiency has no negative impact on patient safety and quality of care.",
keywords = "operating room efficiency, perioperative management, practice improvement methodologies, production pressure, quality improvement, quality of patients care",
author = "Mikhail Chernov and Angela Vick and Sujatha Ramachandran and Reddy, {Shamantha G.} and Galina Leyvi and Delphin, {Ellise S.}",
year = "2018",
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day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/08941939.2018.1492049",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Investigative Surgery",
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AU - Chernov, Mikhail

AU - Vick, Angela

AU - Ramachandran, Sujatha

AU - Reddy, Shamantha G.

AU - Leyvi, Galina

AU - Delphin, Ellise S.

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N2 - Introduction: ATTEMPTS to enforce optimization practices for operating room (OR) efficiency are often interpreted as a “pressure for production” which threatens patient safety. The aim of this study is to assess if and how improvements in OR efficiency affect patient safety and thus the quality of care. Methods: In an attempt to optimize OR efficiency, a new OR management approach “Integrated Practice Improvement Solutions” (IPIS) was developed at the Weiler Division of Montefiore Medical Center in 2011. IPIS is a flexible managerial system based on elements of multiple practice improvement methodologies incorporated into an open source framework. It was implemented in 2012. The data presented covers the period from 2012 through 2014 when the system was temporarily discontinued due to administrative restructuring. Data from 2011 was used as a baseline. The impact of IPIS on patient safety and quality of care was assessed based on quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) Committee reports covering the same period of time. Results: IPIS implementation resulted in an increase in surgical workload by an average of 10.7%, an increase in OR and anesthesia revenues by 18.5% and 6.9%, respectively, and decreases in turnover time by 15% and overtime for the anesthesia staff by 26%. Based on QIPS reports, the total number of complications potentially attributable to “production pressure” was 0.25%, 0.2% and 0.16% in 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively compared to 0.21% in 2011 (p = 0.56). Conclusions: Gradual implementation of a methodologically structured improvement in OR efficiency has no negative impact on patient safety and quality of care.

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