Periconceptional maternal micronutrient supplementation is associated with widespread gender related changes in the epigenome: A study of a unique resource in the Gambia

Khulan Batbayar, Wendy N. Cooper, Benjamin M. Skinner, Julien Bauer, Stephen Owens, Andrew M. Prentice, Gusztav Belteki, Miguel Constancia, David Dunger, Nabeel A. Affara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In addition to the genetic constitution inherited by an organism, the developmental trajectory and resulting mature phenotype are also determined by mechanisms acting during critical windows in early life that influence and establish stable patterns of gene expression. This is the crux of the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis that suggests undernutrition during gestation and infancy predisposes to ill health in later life. The hypothesis that periconceptional maternal micronutrient supplementation might affect fetal genome-wide methylation within gene promoters was explored in cord blood samples from offspring of Gambian women enrolled into a unique randomized, double blind controlled trial. Significant changes in the epigenome in cord blood DNA samples were further explored in a subset of offspring at 9 months. Gender-specific changes related to periconceptional nutritional supplementation were identified in cord blood DNA samples, some of which showed persistent changes in infant blood DNA samples. Significant effects of periconceptional micronutrient supplementation were also observed in postnatal samples which were not evident in cord blood. In this Gambian population, the increased death rate of individuals born in nutritionally poor seasons has been related to infection and it is of interest that we identified differential methylation at genes associated with defence against infection and immune response. Although the sample size was relatively small, these pilot data suggest that periconceptional nutrition in humans is an important determinant of newborn whole genome methylation patterns but may also influence postnatal developmental patterns of gene promoter methylation linking early with disease risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberdds026
Pages (from-to)2086-2101
Number of pages16
JournalHuman Molecular Genetics
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gambia
Micronutrients
Fetal Blood
Methylation
Mothers
DNA
Genome
Developmental Genes
Constitution and Bylaws
Health
Infection
Malnutrition
Sample Size
Genes
Newborn Infant
Phenotype
Gene Expression
Pregnancy
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Periconceptional maternal micronutrient supplementation is associated with widespread gender related changes in the epigenome : A study of a unique resource in the Gambia. / Batbayar, Khulan; Cooper, Wendy N.; Skinner, Benjamin M.; Bauer, Julien; Owens, Stephen; Prentice, Andrew M.; Belteki, Gusztav; Constancia, Miguel; Dunger, David; Affara, Nabeel A.

In: Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 21, No. 9, dds026, 01.05.2012, p. 2086-2101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Batbayar, K, Cooper, WN, Skinner, BM, Bauer, J, Owens, S, Prentice, AM, Belteki, G, Constancia, M, Dunger, D & Affara, NA 2012, 'Periconceptional maternal micronutrient supplementation is associated with widespread gender related changes in the epigenome: A study of a unique resource in the Gambia', Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 21, no. 9, dds026, pp. 2086-2101. https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/dds026
Batbayar, Khulan ; Cooper, Wendy N. ; Skinner, Benjamin M. ; Bauer, Julien ; Owens, Stephen ; Prentice, Andrew M. ; Belteki, Gusztav ; Constancia, Miguel ; Dunger, David ; Affara, Nabeel A. / Periconceptional maternal micronutrient supplementation is associated with widespread gender related changes in the epigenome : A study of a unique resource in the Gambia. In: Human Molecular Genetics. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 9. pp. 2086-2101.
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