Perceptions of primary care-based breastfeeding promotion interventions: Qualitative analysis of randomized controlled trial participant interviews

Elise Andaya, Karen A. Bonuck, Josephine Barnett, Jennifer Lischewski-Goel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined women's perceptions and reported effects of routine, primary care-based interventions to increase breastfeeding. Subjects and Methods: A subsample (n=67) of participants in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) completed semistructured exit interviews at 6 months postpartum. RCT arms included the following: (a) routine pre-/postnatal lactation consultant (LC) support (LC group); (b) electronic prompts (EP) guiding providers to discuss breastfeeding during prenatal care visits (EP group); (c) a combined intervention (LC+EP group); and (d) controls. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed in MAX.qda. Results: Key findings included the following: (1) Brief, non-directive assessment of feeding via postpartum interviews focused attention upon feeding practices. When coupled with breastfeeding promotion interventions, interviews promoted breastfeeding. (2) The EP and LC interventions were complementary: EPs influenced initiation, while LCs helped overcome barriers and sustain breastfeeding. (3) Prenatal intent to feed both breastmilk and formula was associated with the greatest receptivity to study messages. Conclusions: Findings underscore the need for interventions across the continuum of care. Trained LCs in prenatal/postpartum settings and prenatal care providers play important complementary roles that, when coupled with brief telephone feeding assessments, may improve breastfeeding rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-422
Number of pages6
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Breast Feeding
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews
Consultants
Lactation
Prenatal Care
Postpartum Period
Postnatal Care
Continuity of Patient Care
Telephone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery
  • Pediatrics
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Perceptions of primary care-based breastfeeding promotion interventions : Qualitative analysis of randomized controlled trial participant interviews. / Andaya, Elise; Bonuck, Karen A.; Barnett, Josephine; Lischewski-Goel, Jennifer.

In: Breastfeeding Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 6, 01.12.2012, p. 417-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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