Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors: Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

Rina S. Fox, Sarah D. Mills, Scott C. Roesch, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Patricia Gonzalez, Venera Bekteshi, Jianwen Cai, David W. Lounsbury, Gregory A. Talavera, Frank J. Penedo, Vanessa L. Malcarne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the associations among perceived risk, perceived efficacy, and engagement in six cancer-related risk behaviors in a population-based Hispanic/Latino sample. Interviews were conducted with 5,313 Hispanic/Latino adults as part of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants were recruited from the study’s four field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) between February 2010 and June 2011. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were assessed with questions drawn from the Health Interview National Trends Survey. More than half of the sample endorsed perceived risk of cancer associated with the six evaluated behaviors, as well as general perceived efficacy for preventing cancer. Adjusted logistic regression analyses demonstrated significant differences across Hispanic/Latino background groups for perceived risk associated with high consumption of alcohol and saturated fat, low consumption of fruits and vegetables, and insufficient exercise but not with smoking or low consumption of fiber. Differences were also found for the belief, “It seems like everything causes cancer” but not for other perceived efficacy items. Perceived cancer risk and perceived efficacy for preventing cancer were neither independently nor interactively associated with engagement in cancer-related risk behaviors after controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Results suggest that perceptions of risk and efficacy with regard to cancer vary across Hispanic/Latino background groups, and therefore background group differences should be considered in prevention efforts. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were not related to cancer-related risk behaviors among Hispanics/Latinos. Further work is needed to evaluate determinants of cancer-related risk in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
Hispanic Americans
Health
Neoplasms
Efficacy
Cancer
Latinos
Interviews
Alcohol Drinking
Vegetables
Population
Fruit
Logistic Models
Smoking
Fats
Regression Analysis
Exercise

Keywords

  • cancer
  • health behaviors
  • HINTS
  • Hispanic/Latino
  • perceived efficacy
  • perceived risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Fox, R. S., Mills, S. D., Roesch, S. C., Sotres-Alvarez, D., Gonzalez, P., Bekteshi, V., ... Malcarne, V. L. (Accepted/In press). Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors: Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Health Education and Behavior. https://doi.org/10.1177/1090198117744242

Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors : Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. / Fox, Rina S.; Mills, Sarah D.; Roesch, Scott C.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Gonzalez, Patricia; Bekteshi, Venera; Cai, Jianwen; Lounsbury, David W.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Penedo, Frank J.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.

In: Health Education and Behavior, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fox, Rina S. ; Mills, Sarah D. ; Roesch, Scott C. ; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela ; Gonzalez, Patricia ; Bekteshi, Venera ; Cai, Jianwen ; Lounsbury, David W. ; Talavera, Gregory A. ; Penedo, Frank J. ; Malcarne, Vanessa L. / Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors : Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. In: Health Education and Behavior. 2017.
@article{44879e16cb844277929f8381049a3cd1,
title = "Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors: Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study",
abstract = "This study evaluated the associations among perceived risk, perceived efficacy, and engagement in six cancer-related risk behaviors in a population-based Hispanic/Latino sample. Interviews were conducted with 5,313 Hispanic/Latino adults as part of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants were recruited from the study’s four field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) between February 2010 and June 2011. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were assessed with questions drawn from the Health Interview National Trends Survey. More than half of the sample endorsed perceived risk of cancer associated with the six evaluated behaviors, as well as general perceived efficacy for preventing cancer. Adjusted logistic regression analyses demonstrated significant differences across Hispanic/Latino background groups for perceived risk associated with high consumption of alcohol and saturated fat, low consumption of fruits and vegetables, and insufficient exercise but not with smoking or low consumption of fiber. Differences were also found for the belief, “It seems like everything causes cancer” but not for other perceived efficacy items. Perceived cancer risk and perceived efficacy for preventing cancer were neither independently nor interactively associated with engagement in cancer-related risk behaviors after controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Results suggest that perceptions of risk and efficacy with regard to cancer vary across Hispanic/Latino background groups, and therefore background group differences should be considered in prevention efforts. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were not related to cancer-related risk behaviors among Hispanics/Latinos. Further work is needed to evaluate determinants of cancer-related risk in this population.",
keywords = "cancer, health behaviors, HINTS, Hispanic/Latino, perceived efficacy, perceived risk",
author = "Fox, {Rina S.} and Mills, {Sarah D.} and Roesch, {Scott C.} and Daniela Sotres-Alvarez and Patricia Gonzalez and Venera Bekteshi and Jianwen Cai and Lounsbury, {David W.} and Talavera, {Gregory A.} and Penedo, {Frank J.} and Malcarne, {Vanessa L.}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1090198117744242",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Health Education and Behavior",
issn = "1090-1981",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceptions of Cancer Risk/Efficacy and Cancer-Related Risk Behaviors

T2 - Results From the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

AU - Fox, Rina S.

AU - Mills, Sarah D.

AU - Roesch, Scott C.

AU - Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela

AU - Gonzalez, Patricia

AU - Bekteshi, Venera

AU - Cai, Jianwen

AU - Lounsbury, David W.

AU - Talavera, Gregory A.

AU - Penedo, Frank J.

AU - Malcarne, Vanessa L.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - This study evaluated the associations among perceived risk, perceived efficacy, and engagement in six cancer-related risk behaviors in a population-based Hispanic/Latino sample. Interviews were conducted with 5,313 Hispanic/Latino adults as part of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants were recruited from the study’s four field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) between February 2010 and June 2011. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were assessed with questions drawn from the Health Interview National Trends Survey. More than half of the sample endorsed perceived risk of cancer associated with the six evaluated behaviors, as well as general perceived efficacy for preventing cancer. Adjusted logistic regression analyses demonstrated significant differences across Hispanic/Latino background groups for perceived risk associated with high consumption of alcohol and saturated fat, low consumption of fruits and vegetables, and insufficient exercise but not with smoking or low consumption of fiber. Differences were also found for the belief, “It seems like everything causes cancer” but not for other perceived efficacy items. Perceived cancer risk and perceived efficacy for preventing cancer were neither independently nor interactively associated with engagement in cancer-related risk behaviors after controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Results suggest that perceptions of risk and efficacy with regard to cancer vary across Hispanic/Latino background groups, and therefore background group differences should be considered in prevention efforts. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were not related to cancer-related risk behaviors among Hispanics/Latinos. Further work is needed to evaluate determinants of cancer-related risk in this population.

AB - This study evaluated the associations among perceived risk, perceived efficacy, and engagement in six cancer-related risk behaviors in a population-based Hispanic/Latino sample. Interviews were conducted with 5,313 Hispanic/Latino adults as part of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants were recruited from the study’s four field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) between February 2010 and June 2011. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were assessed with questions drawn from the Health Interview National Trends Survey. More than half of the sample endorsed perceived risk of cancer associated with the six evaluated behaviors, as well as general perceived efficacy for preventing cancer. Adjusted logistic regression analyses demonstrated significant differences across Hispanic/Latino background groups for perceived risk associated with high consumption of alcohol and saturated fat, low consumption of fruits and vegetables, and insufficient exercise but not with smoking or low consumption of fiber. Differences were also found for the belief, “It seems like everything causes cancer” but not for other perceived efficacy items. Perceived cancer risk and perceived efficacy for preventing cancer were neither independently nor interactively associated with engagement in cancer-related risk behaviors after controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Results suggest that perceptions of risk and efficacy with regard to cancer vary across Hispanic/Latino background groups, and therefore background group differences should be considered in prevention efforts. Perceived risk and perceived efficacy were not related to cancer-related risk behaviors among Hispanics/Latinos. Further work is needed to evaluate determinants of cancer-related risk in this population.

KW - cancer

KW - health behaviors

KW - HINTS

KW - Hispanic/Latino

KW - perceived efficacy

KW - perceived risk

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041906471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041906471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1090198117744242

DO - 10.1177/1090198117744242

M3 - Article

C2 - 29284295

AN - SCOPUS:85041906471

JO - Health Education and Behavior

JF - Health Education and Behavior

SN - 1090-1981

ER -