Perception and attitude of providers toward pain and anxiety associated with pediatric vaccine injection

Kerianne Brady, Jeffrey R. Avner, Hnin Khine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the many options available for control of the pain and anxiety during vaccine injections, they are not often used. A total of 70 primary care providers (PCPs) were asked to rate their perception of pain and anxiety associated with vaccine injection in an average 4- to 6-year-old using a visual analog scale-0 (no pain/anxiety) to 10 (very severe pain/anxiety)-as well as perceived barriers. The mean PCPs' perception of pain associated with vaccine injection was 5.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3-6.1), and perceived anxiety was 7.7 (95% CI = 7.2-8.1). Trainees recorded higher perceived anxiety than attending physicians (8.0 vs 6.9; P =.03)]. Of the respondents, 63 (90%) felt that pain and anxiety control is achievable in their office setting. Nevertheless, only 8 (11%) PCPs had ordered any pain and anxiety control measures during vaccine injection. There is a gap between the PCPs' perception of pain and anxiety and practice of pain and anxiety control measures during vaccine injection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-143
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Keywords

  • injection
  • pain control and child
  • vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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