Perceived need for and use of mental health services by women living with or at risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

P. Schuman, S. E. Ohmit, J. Moore, Ellie Schoenbaum, R. Boland, A. Rompalo, L. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of and factors associated with perceived need for and use of mental health services and use of psychotherapeutic medications among women in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemiology Research Study (HERS). METHODS: We interviewed 871 HIV-seropositive and 439 demographically and behaviorally similar seronegative women at baseline regarding demographics, psychosocial measures, substance use, medical history, and use of health care services and medications. RESULTS: Thirty-eight percent of HIV-seropositive women and 35% of seronegative women (p = 0.33) reported needing mental health services in the prior six months. Women who were older, were white or Latina (compared with African American), had some college education, had less social support, and reported recent negative life events or had CES-D scores higher than 15 (suggesting depression) were more likely to report needing mental health services. Sixty-seven percent of seropositive and 65% of seronegative women who reported needing services (p = 0.69) reported obtaining services. Women who were white (compared with Latina or African American) and had more education, more social support, and health insurance were more likely to obtain services. Eighteen percent of seropositive and 13% of seronegative women (p = 0.006) reported current use of psychotherapeutic medications, especially antidepressants and antianxiety medications. Women who reported use of medications were more likely to report recent negative life events; were older, white, or Latina; had more education, less social support, CES-D scores higher than 15, and health insurance. CONCLUSION: Women both living with or at risk of HIV perceived a need for and used mental health services in association with negative life events, social isolation, and depressive symptoms. Need for and use of services differed by race/ethnicity, education, and availability of social support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-8
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972)
Volume56
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Health Services
Virus Diseases
HIV
Social Support
Hispanic Americans
Education
Health Insurance
African Americans
Depression
Social Isolation
Social Security
Antidepressive Agents
Health Services
Epidemiology
Demography
Delivery of Health Care

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Perceived need for and use of mental health services by women living with or at risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection. / Schuman, P.; Ohmit, S. E.; Moore, J.; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Boland, R.; Rompalo, A.; Solomon, L.

In: Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972), Vol. 56, No. 1, 2001, p. 4-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Perceived need for and use of mental health services by women living with or at risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of and factors associated with perceived need for and use of mental health services and use of psychotherapeutic medications among women in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemiology Research Study (HERS). METHODS: We interviewed 871 HIV-seropositive and 439 demographically and behaviorally similar seronegative women at baseline regarding demographics, psychosocial measures, substance use, medical history, and use of health care services and medications. RESULTS: Thirty-eight percent of HIV-seropositive women and 35{\%} of seronegative women (p = 0.33) reported needing mental health services in the prior six months. Women who were older, were white or Latina (compared with African American), had some college education, had less social support, and reported recent negative life events or had CES-D scores higher than 15 (suggesting depression) were more likely to report needing mental health services. Sixty-seven percent of seropositive and 65{\%} of seronegative women who reported needing services (p = 0.69) reported obtaining services. Women who were white (compared with Latina or African American) and had more education, more social support, and health insurance were more likely to obtain services. Eighteen percent of seropositive and 13{\%} of seronegative women (p = 0.006) reported current use of psychotherapeutic medications, especially antidepressants and antianxiety medications. Women who reported use of medications were more likely to report recent negative life events; were older, white, or Latina; had more education, less social support, CES-D scores higher than 15, and health insurance. CONCLUSION: Women both living with or at risk of HIV perceived a need for and used mental health services in association with negative life events, social isolation, and depressive symptoms. Need for and use of services differed by race/ethnicity, education, and availability of social support.",
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AU - Solomon, L.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of and factors associated with perceived need for and use of mental health services and use of psychotherapeutic medications among women in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemiology Research Study (HERS). METHODS: We interviewed 871 HIV-seropositive and 439 demographically and behaviorally similar seronegative women at baseline regarding demographics, psychosocial measures, substance use, medical history, and use of health care services and medications. RESULTS: Thirty-eight percent of HIV-seropositive women and 35% of seronegative women (p = 0.33) reported needing mental health services in the prior six months. Women who were older, were white or Latina (compared with African American), had some college education, had less social support, and reported recent negative life events or had CES-D scores higher than 15 (suggesting depression) were more likely to report needing mental health services. Sixty-seven percent of seropositive and 65% of seronegative women who reported needing services (p = 0.69) reported obtaining services. Women who were white (compared with Latina or African American) and had more education, more social support, and health insurance were more likely to obtain services. Eighteen percent of seropositive and 13% of seronegative women (p = 0.006) reported current use of psychotherapeutic medications, especially antidepressants and antianxiety medications. Women who reported use of medications were more likely to report recent negative life events; were older, white, or Latina; had more education, less social support, CES-D scores higher than 15, and health insurance. CONCLUSION: Women both living with or at risk of HIV perceived a need for and used mental health services in association with negative life events, social isolation, and depressive symptoms. Need for and use of services differed by race/ethnicity, education, and availability of social support.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of and factors associated with perceived need for and use of mental health services and use of psychotherapeutic medications among women in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemiology Research Study (HERS). METHODS: We interviewed 871 HIV-seropositive and 439 demographically and behaviorally similar seronegative women at baseline regarding demographics, psychosocial measures, substance use, medical history, and use of health care services and medications. RESULTS: Thirty-eight percent of HIV-seropositive women and 35% of seronegative women (p = 0.33) reported needing mental health services in the prior six months. Women who were older, were white or Latina (compared with African American), had some college education, had less social support, and reported recent negative life events or had CES-D scores higher than 15 (suggesting depression) were more likely to report needing mental health services. Sixty-seven percent of seropositive and 65% of seronegative women who reported needing services (p = 0.69) reported obtaining services. Women who were white (compared with Latina or African American) and had more education, more social support, and health insurance were more likely to obtain services. Eighteen percent of seropositive and 13% of seronegative women (p = 0.006) reported current use of psychotherapeutic medications, especially antidepressants and antianxiety medications. Women who reported use of medications were more likely to report recent negative life events; were older, white, or Latina; had more education, less social support, CES-D scores higher than 15, and health insurance. CONCLUSION: Women both living with or at risk of HIV perceived a need for and used mental health services in association with negative life events, social isolation, and depressive symptoms. Need for and use of services differed by race/ethnicity, education, and availability of social support.

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