Perceived influences on diet among urban, low-income African Americans

Sean C. Lucan, Frances K. Barg, Alison Karasz, Christina S. Palmer, Judith A. Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To understand perceived influences on consumption of fruits, vegetables, and fast foods for urban, low-income African Americans. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 33 African American adults from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, using continuous, iterative, thematic analysis. Results: Influences on dietary behaviors that emerged included economic considerations; food characteristics; health concerns and health effects; participants' personal influences; social and cultural influences; neighborhood, home, and work environments; and broader contextual influences. There were important differences by age group and gender. Conclusion: Strategies to improve dietary patterns in urban, low-income, African-American communities might make use of overall and age- and gender-specific perspectives from within the community we report. Copyright (c) PNG Publications All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-710
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

African Americans
low income
Diet
food
Fast Foods
gender
Health
vegetables
health
Vegetables
work environment
community
Publications
age group
Fruit
Age Groups
Economics
Interviews
Food
interview

Keywords

  • African American
  • Fast food
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Income
  • Qualitative research
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Perceived influences on diet among urban, low-income African Americans. / Lucan, Sean C.; Barg, Frances K.; Karasz, Alison; Palmer, Christina S.; Long, Judith A.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 36, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 700-710.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lucan, Sean C. ; Barg, Frances K. ; Karasz, Alison ; Palmer, Christina S. ; Long, Judith A. / Perceived influences on diet among urban, low-income African Americans. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2012 ; Vol. 36, No. 5. pp. 700-710.
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