Perceived appetite and clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease

Frank W. Ayestaran, Michael F. Schneider, Frederick J. Kaskel, Poyyapakkam R. Srivaths, Patricia W. Seo-Mayer, Marva Moxey-Mims, Susan L. Furth, Bradley A. Warady, Larry A. Greenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have impaired caloric intake through a variety of mechanisms, with decreased appetite as a putative contributor. In adult CKD, decreased appetite has been associated with poor clinical outcomes. There is limited information about this relationship in pediatric CKD. Methods: A total of 879 participants of the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study were studied. Self-reported appetite was assessed annually and categorized as very good, good, fair, or poor/very poor. The relationship between appetite and iohexol or estimated glomerular filtration rate (ieGFR), annual changes in anthropometrics z-scores, hospitalizations, emergency room visits, and quality of life were assessed. Results: An ieGFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 was associated with a 4.46 greater odds (95 % confidence interval: 2.80, 7.09) of having a worse appetite than those with ieGFR >90. Appetite did not predict changes in height, weight, or BMI z-scores. Patients not reporting a very good appetite had more hospitalizations over the next year than those with a very good appetite. Worse appetite was significantly associated with lower parental and patient reported quality of life. Conclusions: Self-reported appetite in children with CKD worsens with lower ieGFR and is correlated with clinical outcomes, including hospitalizations and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Nephrology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 8 2016

Fingerprint

Appetite
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Iohexol
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Hospitalization
Quality of Life
Energy Intake
Hospital Emergency Service
Pediatrics
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • ER visits
  • Hospitalization
  • Nutrition
  • Pediatric
  • Quality of life
  • Renal function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ayestaran, F. W., Schneider, M. F., Kaskel, F. J., Srivaths, P. R., Seo-Mayer, P. W., Moxey-Mims, M., ... Greenbaum, L. A. (Accepted/In press). Perceived appetite and clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease. Pediatric Nephrology, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-016-3321-9

Perceived appetite and clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease. / Ayestaran, Frank W.; Schneider, Michael F.; Kaskel, Frederick J.; Srivaths, Poyyapakkam R.; Seo-Mayer, Patricia W.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Furth, Susan L.; Warady, Bradley A.; Greenbaum, Larry A.

In: Pediatric Nephrology, 08.02.2016, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ayestaran, FW, Schneider, MF, Kaskel, FJ, Srivaths, PR, Seo-Mayer, PW, Moxey-Mims, M, Furth, SL, Warady, BA & Greenbaum, LA 2016, 'Perceived appetite and clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease', Pediatric Nephrology, pp. 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00467-016-3321-9
Ayestaran, Frank W. ; Schneider, Michael F. ; Kaskel, Frederick J. ; Srivaths, Poyyapakkam R. ; Seo-Mayer, Patricia W. ; Moxey-Mims, Marva ; Furth, Susan L. ; Warady, Bradley A. ; Greenbaum, Larry A. / Perceived appetite and clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease. In: Pediatric Nephrology. 2016 ; pp. 1-7.
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