Pediatric Palliative Care

Karen Moody, Linda Siegel, Kathryn Scharbach, Leslie Cunningham, Rabbi Mollie Cantor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-361
Number of pages35
JournalPrimary Care - Clinics in Office Practice
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Palliative Care
Pediatrics
Delivery of Health Care
Bereavement
Terminal Care
Symptom Assessment
Decision Making
Epidemiology
Communication
Research

Keywords

  • Advanced care planning
  • End-of-life care
  • Palliative care
  • Pediatric palliative care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Moody, K., Siegel, L., Scharbach, K., Cunningham, L., & Cantor, R. M. (2011). Pediatric Palliative Care. Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice, 38(2), 327-361. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2011.03.011

Pediatric Palliative Care. / Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie.

In: Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice, Vol. 38, No. 2, 06.2011, p. 327-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moody, K, Siegel, L, Scharbach, K, Cunningham, L & Cantor, RM 2011, 'Pediatric Palliative Care', Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 327-361. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2011.03.011
Moody K, Siegel L, Scharbach K, Cunningham L, Cantor RM. Pediatric Palliative Care. Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice. 2011 Jun;38(2):327-361. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2011.03.011
Moody, Karen ; Siegel, Linda ; Scharbach, Kathryn ; Cunningham, Leslie ; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie. / Pediatric Palliative Care. In: Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 327-361.
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