Patient Care, Resident Stress, and Government Regulation

Michael I. Cohen, Joseph Dancis, Laurence Finberg, Kurt Hirschhorn, Michael Katz, Edward Wasserman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Department of Health of New York State has taken the lead in addressing the problem of resident fatigue, which has been perceived as a possible cause of errors in patient care. The suggested solutions are also designed to alleviate stress among house officers due to overlong work hours with very sick patients. Different specialties have different types of problems with the proposed solution. For example, surgical residents do a certain minimum number of operations that cannot be scheduled conveniently to conform with the recommended residency schedules. In this discussion we will outline the reactions of the chairs and program directors of departments of pediatrics in the state of New York. New York may not be alone in these changes—legislation has been introduced in other states, and their health departments are considering similar recommendations. In New York the health commissioner has the mandate to regulate without.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-182
Number of pages2
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume143
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Government Regulation
Patient Care
Health
Internship and Residency
Fatigue
Appointments and Schedules
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Patient Care, Resident Stress, and Government Regulation. / Cohen, Michael I.; Dancis, Joseph; Finberg, Laurence; Hirschhorn, Kurt; Katz, Michael; Wasserman, Edward.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 143, No. 2, 1989, p. 181-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, MI, Dancis, J, Finberg, L, Hirschhorn, K, Katz, M & Wasserman, E 1989, 'Patient Care, Resident Stress, and Government Regulation', American Journal of Diseases of Children, vol. 143, no. 2, pp. 181-182. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.1989.02150140067022
Cohen, Michael I. ; Dancis, Joseph ; Finberg, Laurence ; Hirschhorn, Kurt ; Katz, Michael ; Wasserman, Edward. / Patient Care, Resident Stress, and Government Regulation. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1989 ; Vol. 143, No. 2. pp. 181-182.
@article{b6d0b9b218a14b218de09389891a0aae,
title = "Patient Care, Resident Stress, and Government Regulation",
abstract = "The Department of Health of New York State has taken the lead in addressing the problem of resident fatigue, which has been perceived as a possible cause of errors in patient care. The suggested solutions are also designed to alleviate stress among house officers due to overlong work hours with very sick patients. Different specialties have different types of problems with the proposed solution. For example, surgical residents do a certain minimum number of operations that cannot be scheduled conveniently to conform with the recommended residency schedules. In this discussion we will outline the reactions of the chairs and program directors of departments of pediatrics in the state of New York. New York may not be alone in these changes—legislation has been introduced in other states, and their health departments are considering similar recommendations. In New York the health commissioner has the mandate to regulate without.",
author = "Cohen, {Michael I.} and Joseph Dancis and Laurence Finberg and Kurt Hirschhorn and Michael Katz and Edward Wasserman",
year = "1989",
doi = "10.1001/archpedi.1989.02150140067022",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "143",
pages = "181--182",
journal = "JAMA Pediatrics",
issn = "2168-6203",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient Care, Resident Stress, and Government Regulation

AU - Cohen, Michael I.

AU - Dancis, Joseph

AU - Finberg, Laurence

AU - Hirschhorn, Kurt

AU - Katz, Michael

AU - Wasserman, Edward

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - The Department of Health of New York State has taken the lead in addressing the problem of resident fatigue, which has been perceived as a possible cause of errors in patient care. The suggested solutions are also designed to alleviate stress among house officers due to overlong work hours with very sick patients. Different specialties have different types of problems with the proposed solution. For example, surgical residents do a certain minimum number of operations that cannot be scheduled conveniently to conform with the recommended residency schedules. In this discussion we will outline the reactions of the chairs and program directors of departments of pediatrics in the state of New York. New York may not be alone in these changes—legislation has been introduced in other states, and their health departments are considering similar recommendations. In New York the health commissioner has the mandate to regulate without.

AB - The Department of Health of New York State has taken the lead in addressing the problem of resident fatigue, which has been perceived as a possible cause of errors in patient care. The suggested solutions are also designed to alleviate stress among house officers due to overlong work hours with very sick patients. Different specialties have different types of problems with the proposed solution. For example, surgical residents do a certain minimum number of operations that cannot be scheduled conveniently to conform with the recommended residency schedules. In this discussion we will outline the reactions of the chairs and program directors of departments of pediatrics in the state of New York. New York may not be alone in these changes—legislation has been introduced in other states, and their health departments are considering similar recommendations. In New York the health commissioner has the mandate to regulate without.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024585219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024585219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/archpedi.1989.02150140067022

DO - 10.1001/archpedi.1989.02150140067022

M3 - Article

C2 - 2916488

AN - SCOPUS:0024585219

VL - 143

SP - 181

EP - 182

JO - JAMA Pediatrics

JF - JAMA Pediatrics

SN - 2168-6203

IS - 2

ER -