Partial hepatectomy and laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): Novel approach for study of liver regeneration

P. J. Gaglio, G. Baskin, Jr Bohm R., J. Blanchard, S. Cheng, B. Dunne, J. Davidson, H. Liu, S. Dash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Although valuable information has been gained using a rodent partial hepatectomy model to assess liver regeneration, the ability to apply this research to humans remains uncertain. Thus, liver regeneration was assessed in a non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Methods: One animal underwent 60% hepatectomy, a second animal underwent 30% hepatectomy, and control surgery (cholecystectomy) was performed on two separate animals. Laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy was performed on days 1, 2, 7, 14, and 30 after surgery. Changes in hemoglobin concentration and alanine transaminase activity were assessed, and liver regeneration was evaluated by measuring the expression of Ki-67. Results: All animals survived surgery and laparoscopy. Substantial liver regeneration was induced in the animal that underwent 60% hepatectomy. Excellent tissue specimens were obtained via laparoscopic-assisted liver biopsy. Conclusions: Sixty percent partial hepatectomy in rhesus macaques appears to be an excellent model for the study of hepatocellular regeneration. The procedure was safe, and effectively induced liver regeneration. In addition, laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy allows observation of changes in the liver remnant as regeneration develops, and provides excellent tissue specimens for analysis. Thus, this rhesus macaque partial hepatectomy model will allow further characterization of liver regeneration in a species closer to humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-368
Number of pages6
JournalComparative Medicine
Volume50
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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liver regeneration
Liver Regeneration
Biopsy
Hepatectomy
Macaca mulatta
Liver
biopsy
liver
Animals
surgery
animals
Regeneration
Surgery
laparoscopy
Cholecystectomy
Alanine Transaminase
alanine transaminase
Laparoscopy
Primates
Rodentia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Gaglio, P. J., Baskin, G., Bohm R., J., Blanchard, J., Cheng, S., Dunne, B., ... Dash, S. (2000). Partial hepatectomy and laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): Novel approach for study of liver regeneration. Comparative Medicine, 50(4), 363-368.

Partial hepatectomy and laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) : Novel approach for study of liver regeneration. / Gaglio, P. J.; Baskin, G.; Bohm R., Jr; Blanchard, J.; Cheng, S.; Dunne, B.; Davidson, J.; Liu, H.; Dash, S.

In: Comparative Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 4, 2000, p. 363-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gaglio, PJ, Baskin, G, Bohm R., J, Blanchard, J, Cheng, S, Dunne, B, Davidson, J, Liu, H & Dash, S 2000, 'Partial hepatectomy and laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): Novel approach for study of liver regeneration', Comparative Medicine, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 363-368.
Gaglio, P. J. ; Baskin, G. ; Bohm R., Jr ; Blanchard, J. ; Cheng, S. ; Dunne, B. ; Davidson, J. ; Liu, H. ; Dash, S. / Partial hepatectomy and laparoscopic-guided liver biopsy in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) : Novel approach for study of liver regeneration. In: Comparative Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 363-368.
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