Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water

M. A. Lodge, R. E. Carson, J. A. Carrasquillo, M. Whatley, S. K. Libutti, S. L. Bacharach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PET was used to measure tumor blood flow, which is potentially valuable for diagnosis and assessing the effects of therapy. To help visualize regional differences in blood flow and to improve the accuracy of region-of-interest placement, a parametric imaging approach was developed and compared with the standard region-of-interest method. Methods: Five patients with renal cell metastases in the thorax were studied using [15O]water and dynamic PET. To assess the reproducibility of the blood flow measurements, multiple water studies were performed on each patient. Model fitting was done on a pixel-by-pixel basis using several different formulations of the standard single-compartment model. Results: The tumors studied spanned a wide range of blood flows, varying from 0.4 to 4.2 mL/min/g. These values were generally high compared with those of most other tissues, which meant that the tumors could be readily identified in parametric images of flow. The different model formulations produced images with different characteristics, and no model was entirely valid throughout the field of view. Although tumor blood flow measured from the parametric images was largely unbiased with respect to a standard regional method, large errors were observed with certain models in regions of low flow. The most robust model throughout the field of view had only 1 free parameter and, compared with a regional method, gave rise to a flow bias of 0.3% ± 3.1% for tumor and 16% ± 11% for low-flow soft tissue (muscle plus fat). With this model, tumor blood flow was measured with an SD of 7.6% ± 4.0%. Conclusion: Parametric imaging provides a convenient way of visualizing regional changes in blood flow, which may be valuable in studies of tumor blood flow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1784-1792
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume41
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Water
Neoplasms
Thorax
Fats
Neoplasm Metastasis
Kidney
Muscles
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • [O]water
  • Parametric image
  • PET
  • Tumor blood flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Lodge, M. A., Carson, R. E., Carrasquillo, J. A., Whatley, M., Libutti, S. K., & Bacharach, S. L. (2000). Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water. Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 41(11), 1784-1792.

Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water. / Lodge, M. A.; Carson, R. E.; Carrasquillo, J. A.; Whatley, M.; Libutti, S. K.; Bacharach, S. L.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 11, 2000, p. 1784-1792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lodge, MA, Carson, RE, Carrasquillo, JA, Whatley, M, Libutti, SK & Bacharach, SL 2000, 'Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water', Journal of Nuclear Medicine, vol. 41, no. 11, pp. 1784-1792.
Lodge MA, Carson RE, Carrasquillo JA, Whatley M, Libutti SK, Bacharach SL. Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water. Journal of Nuclear Medicine. 2000;41(11):1784-1792.
Lodge, M. A. ; Carson, R. E. ; Carrasquillo, J. A. ; Whatley, M. ; Libutti, S. K. ; Bacharach, S. L. / Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water. In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 41, No. 11. pp. 1784-1792.
@article{2fcdc1dad549486b9f2fc32d2ab7c55e,
title = "Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water",
abstract = "PET was used to measure tumor blood flow, which is potentially valuable for diagnosis and assessing the effects of therapy. To help visualize regional differences in blood flow and to improve the accuracy of region-of-interest placement, a parametric imaging approach was developed and compared with the standard region-of-interest method. Methods: Five patients with renal cell metastases in the thorax were studied using [15O]water and dynamic PET. To assess the reproducibility of the blood flow measurements, multiple water studies were performed on each patient. Model fitting was done on a pixel-by-pixel basis using several different formulations of the standard single-compartment model. Results: The tumors studied spanned a wide range of blood flows, varying from 0.4 to 4.2 mL/min/g. These values were generally high compared with those of most other tissues, which meant that the tumors could be readily identified in parametric images of flow. The different model formulations produced images with different characteristics, and no model was entirely valid throughout the field of view. Although tumor blood flow measured from the parametric images was largely unbiased with respect to a standard regional method, large errors were observed with certain models in regions of low flow. The most robust model throughout the field of view had only 1 free parameter and, compared with a regional method, gave rise to a flow bias of 0.3{\%} ± 3.1{\%} for tumor and 16{\%} ± 11{\%} for low-flow soft tissue (muscle plus fat). With this model, tumor blood flow was measured with an SD of 7.6{\%} ± 4.0{\%}. Conclusion: Parametric imaging provides a convenient way of visualizing regional changes in blood flow, which may be valuable in studies of tumor blood flow.",
keywords = "[O]water, Parametric image, PET, Tumor blood flow",
author = "Lodge, {M. A.} and Carson, {R. E.} and Carrasquillo, {J. A.} and M. Whatley and Libutti, {S. K.} and Bacharach, {S. L.}",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "1784--1792",
journal = "Journal of Nuclear Medicine",
issn = "0161-5505",
publisher = "Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parametric images of blood flow in oncology PET studies using [15O]water

AU - Lodge, M. A.

AU - Carson, R. E.

AU - Carrasquillo, J. A.

AU - Whatley, M.

AU - Libutti, S. K.

AU - Bacharach, S. L.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - PET was used to measure tumor blood flow, which is potentially valuable for diagnosis and assessing the effects of therapy. To help visualize regional differences in blood flow and to improve the accuracy of region-of-interest placement, a parametric imaging approach was developed and compared with the standard region-of-interest method. Methods: Five patients with renal cell metastases in the thorax were studied using [15O]water and dynamic PET. To assess the reproducibility of the blood flow measurements, multiple water studies were performed on each patient. Model fitting was done on a pixel-by-pixel basis using several different formulations of the standard single-compartment model. Results: The tumors studied spanned a wide range of blood flows, varying from 0.4 to 4.2 mL/min/g. These values were generally high compared with those of most other tissues, which meant that the tumors could be readily identified in parametric images of flow. The different model formulations produced images with different characteristics, and no model was entirely valid throughout the field of view. Although tumor blood flow measured from the parametric images was largely unbiased with respect to a standard regional method, large errors were observed with certain models in regions of low flow. The most robust model throughout the field of view had only 1 free parameter and, compared with a regional method, gave rise to a flow bias of 0.3% ± 3.1% for tumor and 16% ± 11% for low-flow soft tissue (muscle plus fat). With this model, tumor blood flow was measured with an SD of 7.6% ± 4.0%. Conclusion: Parametric imaging provides a convenient way of visualizing regional changes in blood flow, which may be valuable in studies of tumor blood flow.

AB - PET was used to measure tumor blood flow, which is potentially valuable for diagnosis and assessing the effects of therapy. To help visualize regional differences in blood flow and to improve the accuracy of region-of-interest placement, a parametric imaging approach was developed and compared with the standard region-of-interest method. Methods: Five patients with renal cell metastases in the thorax were studied using [15O]water and dynamic PET. To assess the reproducibility of the blood flow measurements, multiple water studies were performed on each patient. Model fitting was done on a pixel-by-pixel basis using several different formulations of the standard single-compartment model. Results: The tumors studied spanned a wide range of blood flows, varying from 0.4 to 4.2 mL/min/g. These values were generally high compared with those of most other tissues, which meant that the tumors could be readily identified in parametric images of flow. The different model formulations produced images with different characteristics, and no model was entirely valid throughout the field of view. Although tumor blood flow measured from the parametric images was largely unbiased with respect to a standard regional method, large errors were observed with certain models in regions of low flow. The most robust model throughout the field of view had only 1 free parameter and, compared with a regional method, gave rise to a flow bias of 0.3% ± 3.1% for tumor and 16% ± 11% for low-flow soft tissue (muscle plus fat). With this model, tumor blood flow was measured with an SD of 7.6% ± 4.0%. Conclusion: Parametric imaging provides a convenient way of visualizing regional changes in blood flow, which may be valuable in studies of tumor blood flow.

KW - [O]water

KW - Parametric image

KW - PET

KW - Tumor blood flow

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033768126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033768126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11079484

AN - SCOPUS:0033768126

VL - 41

SP - 1784

EP - 1792

JO - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

JF - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

SN - 0161-5505

IS - 11

ER -