Oxytocin and experimental therapeutics in autism spectrum disorders

Jennifer A. Bartz, Eric Hollander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autism is a developmental disorder characterized by three core symptom domains: speech and communication abnormalities, social functioning impairments and repetitive behaviours and restricted interests. Oxytocin (OXT) is a nine-amino-acid peptide that is synthesized in the paraventricular and supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus and released into the bloodstream by axon terminals in the posterior pituitary where it plays an important role in facilitating uterine contractions during parturition and in milk let-down. In addition, OXT and the structurally similar peptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) are released within the brain where they play a key role in regulating affiliative behaviours, including sexual behaviour, mother-infant and adult-adult pair-bond formation and social memory/recognition. Finally, OXT has been implicated in repetitive behaviours and stress reactivity. Given that OXT is involved in the regulation of repetitive and affiliative behaviours, and that these are key features of autism, it is believed that OXT may play a role in autism and that OXT may be an effective treatment for these two core symptom domains. In this chapter we review evidence to date supporting a relationship between OXT and autism; we then discuss research looking at the functional role of OXT in autism, as well as a pilot study investigating the therapeutic efficacy of OXT in treating core autism symptom domains. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-462
Number of pages12
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume170
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxytocin
Autistic Disorder
Therapeutics
Pair Bond
Milk Ejection
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Supraoptic Nucleus
Uterine Contraction
Peptides
Arginine Vasopressin
Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus
Presynaptic Terminals
Sexual Behavior
Communication
Mothers
Parturition
Amino Acids
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • autism spectrum disorders
  • experimental therapeutics
  • oxytocin
  • repetitive behaviours
  • social cognition
  • social functioning
  • treatment
  • vasopressin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Oxytocin and experimental therapeutics in autism spectrum disorders. / Bartz, Jennifer A.; Hollander, Eric.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 170, 2008, p. 451-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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