Overweight prevention in pediatric primary care: A needs assessment of an urban racial/ethnic minority population

Philomena A. Asante, Joanne Cox, Kendrin Sonneville, Ronald C. Samuels, Elsie M. Taveras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors studied the prevalence of overweight-related behaviors in an urban clinic population, parents' perceived willingness to change, and identified potential gaps in nutrition and physical activity promotion. A total of 324 parents of children aged 3 to 13 years were surveyed. Clinical heights and weights were used to calculate body mass index (BMI). Of the 324 children in the study, 55% were black and 28% were Hispanic. Approximately 151 (47%) children had a BMI ≥85th percentile, and overweight-related behaviors, such as TV viewing, were highly prevalent. Overall, parents reported a need for counseling to help their children eat healthier and be more active and seemed willing to make behavior changes in these areas. However, their willingness to change appeared lowest in areas that may improve their child's weight status such as decreasing sedentary time and portion sizes. Overweight prevention efforts in primary care should include strategies to help clinicians negotiate behavior change with families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-843
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume48
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Counseling
  • Overweight prevention
  • Primary care
  • Racial/ethnic minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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