Overexpression of Eg5 causes genomic instability and tumor formation in mice

Andrew Castillo, Herbert C. Morse, Virginia L. Godfrey, Rizwan C. Naeem, Monica J. Justice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proper chromosome segregation in eukaryotes is driven by a complex superstructure called the mitotic spindle. Assembly, maintenance, and function of the spindle depend on centrosome migration, organization of microtubule arrays, and force generation by microtubule motors. Spindle pole migration and elongation are controlled by the unique balance of forces generated by antagonistic molecular motors that act upon microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Defects in components of this complex structure have been shown to lead to chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. Here, we show that overexpression of Eg5, a member of the Bim-C class of kinesin-related proteins, leads to disruption of normal spindle development, as we observe both monopolar and multipolar spindles in Eg5 transgenic mice. Our findings showthat perturbation of the mitotic spindle leads to chromosomal missegregation and the accumulation of tetraploid cells. Aging of these mice revealed a higher incidence of tumor formation with a mixed array of tumor types appearing in mice ages 3 to 30 months with the mean age of 20 months. Analysis of the tumors revealed widespread aneuploidy and genetic instability, both hallmarks of nearly all solid tumors. Together with previous findings, our results indicate that Eg5 overexpression disrupts the unique balance of forces associated with normal spindle assembly and function, and thereby leads to the development of spindle defects, genetic instability, and tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10138-10147
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Research
Volume67
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Genomic Instability
Spindle Apparatus
Microtubules
Neoplasms
Spindle Poles
Kinesin
Centrosome
Chromosomal Instability
Chromosome Segregation
Tetraploidy
Aneuploidy
Eukaryota
Transgenic Mice
Maintenance
Incidence
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Overexpression of Eg5 causes genomic instability and tumor formation in mice. / Castillo, Andrew; Morse, Herbert C.; Godfrey, Virginia L.; Naeem, Rizwan C.; Justice, Monica J.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 67, No. 21, 01.11.2007, p. 10138-10147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castillo, Andrew ; Morse, Herbert C. ; Godfrey, Virginia L. ; Naeem, Rizwan C. ; Justice, Monica J. / Overexpression of Eg5 causes genomic instability and tumor formation in mice. In: Cancer Research. 2007 ; Vol. 67, No. 21. pp. 10138-10147.
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