Outcomes of glued foldable intraocular lens implantation in eyes with preexisting complications and combined surgical procedures

Joann J. Kang, David C. Ritterband, Sherif S. Tolees, John A. Seedor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose To evaluate the visual outcomes and complications of glued foldable intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in patients with a wide range of ocular pathologies and/or having combined surgical procedures. Setting New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. Design Retrospective case series. Methods A chart review was conducted of all glued foldable IOL procedures performed in eyes with absent or insufficient capsule support. Patients with a postoperative follow-up less than 3 months were excluded from analysis. Intraoperative and postoperative complications, the postoperative course, and visual and refractive outcomes were analyzed. Results Sixty-five eyes (64 patients) were evaluated over a mean follow-up of 9.1 months ± 6.2 (SD). Ocular comorbidities were present in 98.5% of eyes, and 95.4% had additional concurrent surgical procedures. There was a statistically significant improvement in corrected distance visual acuity (P =.046), with 89.2% of eyes achieving better or equal vision postoperatively. Intraoperative complications included ocular hemorrhage (10.8%), haptic deformation (10.8%), and haptic breakage (1.5%). Postoperative complications included elevated intraocular pressure (13.8%), optic capture (12.3%), persistent anterior chamber inflammation (6.2%), IOL tilt (4.6%), cystoid macular edema (3.1%), recurrent ocular hemorrhage (3.1%), and retinal detachment (1.5%). Conclusion The glued foldable IOL technique resulted in favorable visual outcomes but with a moderate risk for IOL-related and other postoperative complications in eyes with complex ocular comorbidities having combined surgical procedures. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1839-1844
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

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