Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa.

Joseph A. Katakowski, Deborah Palliser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RNA interference (RNAi) describes a highly conserved pathway, present in eukaryotic cells, for regulating gene expression. Small stretches of double-stranded RNA, termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), utilize this pathway to bind homologous mRNA, resulting in site-specific mRNA cleavage and subsequent protein degradation. The ubiquitous presence of the RNAi machinery, combined with its specificity and efficacy, makes it an attractive mechanism for reducing aberrant gene expression in therapeutic settings. However, a major obstacle to utilizing RNAi in the clinic is siRNA delivery. Administered siRNAs must make contact with the appropriate cell types and, following internalization, gain access to the cytosol where the RNAi machinery resides. This must be achieved so that silencing is maximized, whilst minimizing any undesirable off-target effects. Recently, the utility of siRNAs as a microbicide, usually applied to the genital mucosa for preventing transmission of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV-1 and HSV-2, has been investigated. In this review we will describe these studies and discuss potential strategies for improving gene silencing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-132
Number of pages9
JournalDiscovery medicine
Volume11
Issue number57
StatePublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

RNA Interference
Small Interfering RNA
Mucous Membrane
Gene Expression
Messenger RNA
Human Herpesvirus 2
Double-Stranded RNA
Gene Silencing
Eukaryotic Cells
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Anti-Infective Agents
Cytosol
Proteolysis
HIV-1
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Katakowski, J. A., & Palliser, D. (2011). Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa. Discovery medicine, 11(57), 124-132.

Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa. / Katakowski, Joseph A.; Palliser, Deborah.

In: Discovery medicine, Vol. 11, No. 57, 02.2011, p. 124-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katakowski, JA & Palliser, D 2011, 'Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa.', Discovery medicine, vol. 11, no. 57, pp. 124-132.
Katakowski JA, Palliser D. Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa. Discovery medicine. 2011 Feb;11(57):124-132.
Katakowski, Joseph A. ; Palliser, Deborah. / Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa. In: Discovery medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 57. pp. 124-132.
@article{aff34c0ac9554344a0c8926eb5e3aa51,
title = "Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa.",
abstract = "RNA interference (RNAi) describes a highly conserved pathway, present in eukaryotic cells, for regulating gene expression. Small stretches of double-stranded RNA, termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), utilize this pathway to bind homologous mRNA, resulting in site-specific mRNA cleavage and subsequent protein degradation. The ubiquitous presence of the RNAi machinery, combined with its specificity and efficacy, makes it an attractive mechanism for reducing aberrant gene expression in therapeutic settings. However, a major obstacle to utilizing RNAi in the clinic is siRNA delivery. Administered siRNAs must make contact with the appropriate cell types and, following internalization, gain access to the cytosol where the RNAi machinery resides. This must be achieved so that silencing is maximized, whilst minimizing any undesirable off-target effects. Recently, the utility of siRNAs as a microbicide, usually applied to the genital mucosa for preventing transmission of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV-1 and HSV-2, has been investigated. In this review we will describe these studies and discuss potential strategies for improving gene silencing.",
author = "Katakowski, {Joseph A.} and Deborah Palliser",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "124--132",
journal = "Discovery medicine",
issn = "1539-6509",
publisher = "Discovery Medicine",
number = "57",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimizing siRNA delivery to the genital mucosa.

AU - Katakowski, Joseph A.

AU - Palliser, Deborah

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - RNA interference (RNAi) describes a highly conserved pathway, present in eukaryotic cells, for regulating gene expression. Small stretches of double-stranded RNA, termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), utilize this pathway to bind homologous mRNA, resulting in site-specific mRNA cleavage and subsequent protein degradation. The ubiquitous presence of the RNAi machinery, combined with its specificity and efficacy, makes it an attractive mechanism for reducing aberrant gene expression in therapeutic settings. However, a major obstacle to utilizing RNAi in the clinic is siRNA delivery. Administered siRNAs must make contact with the appropriate cell types and, following internalization, gain access to the cytosol where the RNAi machinery resides. This must be achieved so that silencing is maximized, whilst minimizing any undesirable off-target effects. Recently, the utility of siRNAs as a microbicide, usually applied to the genital mucosa for preventing transmission of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV-1 and HSV-2, has been investigated. In this review we will describe these studies and discuss potential strategies for improving gene silencing.

AB - RNA interference (RNAi) describes a highly conserved pathway, present in eukaryotic cells, for regulating gene expression. Small stretches of double-stranded RNA, termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), utilize this pathway to bind homologous mRNA, resulting in site-specific mRNA cleavage and subsequent protein degradation. The ubiquitous presence of the RNAi machinery, combined with its specificity and efficacy, makes it an attractive mechanism for reducing aberrant gene expression in therapeutic settings. However, a major obstacle to utilizing RNAi in the clinic is siRNA delivery. Administered siRNAs must make contact with the appropriate cell types and, following internalization, gain access to the cytosol where the RNAi machinery resides. This must be achieved so that silencing is maximized, whilst minimizing any undesirable off-target effects. Recently, the utility of siRNAs as a microbicide, usually applied to the genital mucosa for preventing transmission of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV-1 and HSV-2, has been investigated. In this review we will describe these studies and discuss potential strategies for improving gene silencing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955518602&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955518602&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 21356167

AN - SCOPUS:79955518602

VL - 11

SP - 124

EP - 132

JO - Discovery medicine

JF - Discovery medicine

SN - 1539-6509

IS - 57

ER -