Obesity-related comorbidities in obese African Americans in an outpatient weight loss program

Aluko A. Hope, Shiriki K. Kumanyika, Melicia C. Whitt, Justine Shults

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To identify, among obese African-American enrollees in an outpatient weight loss program, differences between those with and without obesity-related comorbidities (ORCMs). Research Methods and Procedures: Data were from 237 obese African Americans (BMI, 30 to 50 kg/m 2; 90% women) who enrolled in a 10-week lifestyle weight loss program. Analyses compared subgroups defined by ORCM status (from medical history) on baseline characteristics, program attendance, and postprogram weight change. Results: Most participants (76%) had one or more ORCMs. Those with versus without ORCMs, respectively, were older (mean age, 45.6 vs. 37.1 years; p < 0.001), were less educated (59.2% vs. 76.6% with >12 years; p = 0.031), were more likely to perceive a physical limitation affecting activity (22.2% vs. 1.8%; p < 0.001), and had higher waist circumference (mean, 113.7 vs. 106.9 cm; p < 0.001) but not BMI (38.3 vs. 37.0 kg/m 2; p = 0.095). Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independence of these associations. Having ORCMs was not associated with class attendance or return for data collection after the 10-week program. Postprogram weight change (n = 134) was unrelated to ORCMs, but better weight loss was seen among those without perceived physical limitations (1.9 vs. 0.4 kg in those without versus with limitations; p = 0.069). Conclusion: Data from this clinical sample of obese African Americans suggest that waist circumference is relevant to ORCM status at BMI levels up to 50 kg/m 2. Clear indications for tailoring of treatment based on ORCM status were not identified, although the possible influence of ORCM-related activity limitations warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)772-779
Number of pages8
JournalObesity Research
Volume13
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Weight Reduction Programs
African Americans
Comorbidity
obesity
Outpatients
weight loss
Obesity
waist circumference
Waist Circumference
comorbidity
medical history
Weights and Measures
research methods
lifestyle
Life Style
Weight Loss
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Obesity-related comorbidity
  • Physical limitation
  • Waist circumference
  • Weight loss program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Obesity-related comorbidities in obese African Americans in an outpatient weight loss program. / Hope, Aluko A.; Kumanyika, Shiriki K.; Whitt, Melicia C.; Shults, Justine.

In: Obesity Research, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2005, p. 772-779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hope, AA, Kumanyika, SK, Whitt, MC & Shults, J 2005, 'Obesity-related comorbidities in obese African Americans in an outpatient weight loss program', Obesity Research, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 772-779.
Hope, Aluko A. ; Kumanyika, Shiriki K. ; Whitt, Melicia C. ; Shults, Justine. / Obesity-related comorbidities in obese African Americans in an outpatient weight loss program. In: Obesity Research. 2005 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 772-779.
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AB - Objective: To identify, among obese African-American enrollees in an outpatient weight loss program, differences between those with and without obesity-related comorbidities (ORCMs). Research Methods and Procedures: Data were from 237 obese African Americans (BMI, 30 to 50 kg/m 2; 90% women) who enrolled in a 10-week lifestyle weight loss program. Analyses compared subgroups defined by ORCM status (from medical history) on baseline characteristics, program attendance, and postprogram weight change. Results: Most participants (76%) had one or more ORCMs. Those with versus without ORCMs, respectively, were older (mean age, 45.6 vs. 37.1 years; p < 0.001), were less educated (59.2% vs. 76.6% with >12 years; p = 0.031), were more likely to perceive a physical limitation affecting activity (22.2% vs. 1.8%; p < 0.001), and had higher waist circumference (mean, 113.7 vs. 106.9 cm; p < 0.001) but not BMI (38.3 vs. 37.0 kg/m 2; p = 0.095). Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independence of these associations. Having ORCMs was not associated with class attendance or return for data collection after the 10-week program. Postprogram weight change (n = 134) was unrelated to ORCMs, but better weight loss was seen among those without perceived physical limitations (1.9 vs. 0.4 kg in those without versus with limitations; p = 0.069). Conclusion: Data from this clinical sample of obese African Americans suggest that waist circumference is relevant to ORCM status at BMI levels up to 50 kg/m 2. Clear indications for tailoring of treatment based on ORCM status were not identified, although the possible influence of ORCM-related activity limitations warrants further study.

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KW - Obesity-related comorbidity

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KW - Waist circumference

KW - Weight loss program

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