Nursing as an Additional Language and Culture (NALC): Supporting Student Success in a Second-Degree Nursing Program

Renee E. Cantwell, Daria Napierkowski, Daniel A. Gundersen, Zoon Naqvi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

: The nursing workforce does not represent the diversity of the United States population and while recruitment of diverse nursing students is high, so are their rates of attrition. The Nursing as an Additional Language and Culture Program (NALC) was implemented in an accelerated, second-degree baccalaureate nursing program to enhance retention by minimizing barriers and supporting activities to enhance student success. Results suggest that the NALC program was successful in decreasing the attrition rate of nursing students, including minority students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-123
Number of pages3
JournalNursing Education Perspectives
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Nursing
nursing
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Students
language
Nursing Students
student
minority
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Nursing as an Additional Language and Culture (NALC) : Supporting Student Success in a Second-Degree Nursing Program. / Cantwell, Renee E.; Napierkowski, Daria; Gundersen, Daniel A.; Naqvi, Zoon.

In: Nursing Education Perspectives, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 121-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cantwell, Renee E. ; Napierkowski, Daria ; Gundersen, Daniel A. ; Naqvi, Zoon. / Nursing as an Additional Language and Culture (NALC) : Supporting Student Success in a Second-Degree Nursing Program. In: Nursing Education Perspectives. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 121-123.
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